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  • Smart Reads: Lydia Denworth’s “I Can Hear You Whisper”

    When science writer Lydia Denworth’s son Alex was nearly two years old, doctors discovered that he had significant hearing loss that was only likely to get worse. Denworth was thrown into the nexus of scientific, cultural and political issues surrounding hearing. We sat down with Lydia Denworth...

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  • One 3-D printed wonder is the Mechaneu, a ball of interlocking gears and supports. When you twist one side, the whole sphere comes alive with motion. Mechaneu is futuristic in more ways than one; makers created the object with the help of computer algorithms that mimic the growth of cells in the body.
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    Pythagorean CupThis ancient trick cup allows an unsuspecting user to consume a drink, but only in moderation. The cup’s stem hides a thin cavity that leads to a hole on the bottom. Fill the cup too full and the liquid floods the chamber, creating a siphon from the hydrostatic pressure (the weight of the water above) and draining the cup right into the overindulgent drinker’s lap. Use wisely.
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    BuckyballThe soccer ball-shaped molecule buckminsterfullerene was the first near-spherical arrangement of carbon atoms ever discovered. Scientists made it easy to synthesize buckminsterfullerene in the 1990s, but it also occurs naturally in soot and was even found floating in deep space. A real “buckyball” is too small for the naked eye to see, but now you can make one big enough for your desk!
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    Klein Bottle Bottle OpenerTechnically, you’d need a 4-D printer to make a true Klein bottle. This mathematical oddity (made of two joined Mobius strips) is a bottle that would contain itself – the inside is the outside, and vice versa. The 3-D representation intersects itself, though the 4-D version wouldn’t.
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    Anatomical Heart Cookie CutterEat your heart out with this 3-D printed cookie cutter displaying the anterior (front) view of our blood-pumping muscle, perfectly shaped to create anatomically correct Valentine’s Day cookies. At the top sits the aorta, the largest artery in the body and the route oxygen-rich blood takes when it leaves the left ventricle. (Need more cookie-based learning? The same folks make cookie cutters for elements of the periodic table).
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    Wooly MammothThe Smithsonian is beginning to digitize many of its artifacts, and is making some of them – such as Amelia Earhart’s flight suit, Lincoln’s death mask, and this wooly mammoth – available for printing at home. These giant beasts crossed a land bridge between Asian and North America and lived with some of the first humans in North America, tens of thousands of years ago.
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    Build Your Own RobotFor the truly ambitious, you can download and print your own humanoid robot parts, including chest and skull plates. Need some inspiration in designing your own automaton? Perhaps you could take a cue from one of the first robots, Westinghouse’s Elektro, a massive golden machine from the 1930s that could walk, talk (using pre-recorded words played back on a record player), smoke cigarettes, and blow up balloons.
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    NASA’s Galileo SpacecraftGalileo was the first craft to orbit Jupiter and assist scientists in researching the gas giant and its moons. The original craft was deliberately destroyed in 2003 when NASA directed it to take a fatal swan dive into Jupiter’s atmosphere. But now it’s been resurrected in convenient toy form! At the top, you can see the low-gain antenna that transmitted data back to Earth. The long boom arms held magnetometer sensors and the generators that provided power by harnessing the decay of plutonium.
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    Earth Relief GlobeThis 3-D printed relief globe exaggerates land masses to illustrate the geological evolution of Earth. Many of the mountain ranges that crisscross continents are the result of tectonic plates smashing together (creating folds) or moving apart (releasing volcanic activity). The globe has to caricature these ridges, though – at accurate scaling, the mountains would be almost unnoticeable!
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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    Stainless Steel Dopamine NecklaceDopamine is one of many neurotransmitters (chemicals that carry signals between nerve cells) linked to feelings of happiness. While it is best known for its role in reward-motivated behavior, dopamine is also thought to play a role in a range of conditions from Parkinson’s disease to ADHD – and can also be injected to treat a heart attack. This printed dopamine necklace won’t directly affect your brain, but you may feel a slight sense of reward when other science nerds compliment you on your good taste.
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    10 Awesome 3-D Printed Objects Inspired by Science

    With a 3-D printer, all you need to create whatever you can imagine is plastic or metal alloy wire and a bit of time. Using a technique called “additive manufacturing,” a 3-D printer builds up layers of material into whatever knob, part, utensil, fashion accessory, or miniature you fancy. The...

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  • Attack Of The Invasive Species!

    America is facing an animal invasion on multiple fronts. These invaders aren’t looking to start a war—only to, make a home. But however benign their intentions might be, invasive species unfortunately pose threats to native species, and upset the balance of native ecosystems. Some are...

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  • First Solar-Powered Circumnavigation Ready For Takeoff

    After flying a plane across the United States last summer using nothing but the sun for power, Swiss pilots Andre Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard have their eye on the whole enchilada. On Wednesday, April 9 they unveiled a solar-powered aircraft they believe will help them circumnavigate the globe...

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  • 2014 World Science Festival Gala Recap

    Thank you to all our guests for helping make this year’s World Science Festival Gala a smashing success! This year we honored brilliant geneticist, Mary-Claire King, and Alan Alda was the host. We gathered some of the highlights from the celebration.

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  • Pterosaurs Take to the Skies of NYC

    While dinosaurs might’ve ruled the earth millions of years ago, pterosaurs were ruling the skies at the same time. And these flying reptiles get the royal treatment in the American Museum of Natural History’s new exhibit “Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs.”

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  • Meet WSF Gala Honoree Mary-Claire King, Ground-Breaking Geneticist

    The 2014 World Science Festival Gala, hosted by Alan Alda, will honor Dr. Mary-Claire King and celebrate the adventure and culture of science with outstanding performances and science-infused delicacies on April 7, 2014. For more information, click here.


    Dr. Mary-Claire King’s responsibility as a...

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  • Dr. James Watson on Searching for the Cure for Cancer

    He stunned the world by cracking the code of life in 1953.  The discovery of the double helix has had a breathtaking impact on modern science and medicine, and continues his legacy in research.  Dr. Watson discusses his “most important work since the double helix” searching for the elusive cure for...

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  • How a Phone Call Works…Then and Now

    40 years ago, the first cell phone call was made. We take a look back over a century of how phone communication has evolved. Check out this infographic showing, from a scientific and technical perspective, what happened then and what happens now, every time you make a call.

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  • Understanding Ebola: Outbreak In Guinea

    An Ebola virus disease outbreak centered on the West African country of Guinea has claimed more than 80 lives so far. Here’s a primer on this deadly disease.

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  • Mer-Monkeys And Guitar Nipple: Ten Curious Scientific Hoaxes

    A rundown of some of the biggest scientific frauds in history – at least, the ones that have been exposed.

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  • First Evidence for Primordial Ripples in Space

    Today’s announcement from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, about the detection of “gravitational waves” emanating from the universe’s first moments, is tremendously exciting, but a little tough for the layman to grasp. We caught up with Brian Greene, in Vancouver to give a...

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  • Is Time Real?

    The flow of time is central to human experience. The past drifts away and the future relentlessly approaches. But does time really flow? Or, as Einstein suggested, might the distinction between past, present and future be an illusion?

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  • The Moth and WSF series

    The Moth and WSF team up to bring you poignant, hilarious and unpredictable stories of science.

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  • Higgs Boson Discovery Wins Nobel Prize for Physics

    Peter Higgs and Francois Englert win Nobel Prize in Physics.  Want to know what makes the Higgs Boson Nobel Prize-worthy? Brian Greene explains.  Also, watch as he explains some math behind it.

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  • Beyond Cosmic Molasses

    Watch an overview of the math behind the Nobel Prize-winning Higgs Boson discovery with Brian Greene.

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  • There and Back Again: A Packet’s Tale. How Does the Internet Work?

    The video lets you ride shotgun with a packet of data—one of trillions involved in the trillions of Internet interactions that happen every second. Look deep beneath the surface of the most basic Internet transaction, and follow the packet as it flows from your fingertips, through circuits,...

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  • MAVEN Satellite Takes Off for Mars

    NASA’s MAVEN mission is scheduled to launch on Monday, November 18. In this WSF video, NASA scientist Michelle Thaller talks about what MAVEN could reveal about Mars’ lost atmosphere and teach us about the life cycle of planets.


    For more on exploring Mars and investigating signs of life on...

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  • Alec Baldwin Asks What’s Your Favorite Film Score

    Alec Baldwin asks filmmakers Joel & Ethan Coen, neuroscientist Aniruddh D. Patel, and film composer Carter Burwell, “What is one of your favorite musical score moments in a movie?” Watch this excerpt from Art of the Score: The Mind, Music, and Moving Images

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  • Music vs. Sound Effects and Silence

    The combination of music, sound effects and silence can create heightened emotional reactions. Alec Baldwin leads a conversation with the Coen Brothers, composer Carter Burwell and neuroscientist, Ani Patel that investigates these effects using a memorable scene from “Barton Fink.” Learn more about...

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  • A Woman of Genius

    Marie Curie was a woman whose profound achievements changed science forever. Her remarkable story was among those featured in the WSF program Beautiful Minds: The Enigma of Genius. The program began with a theatrical piece exploring genius, and this chosen excerpt highlights Curie, the first woman...

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  • Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    This year at NYCC, we brought together a group of authors and scientists for a conversation about how the art, science and storytelling of comic books and graphic novels can be a launch pad into worlds of scientific exploration and discovery.

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    Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    Brian Greene introduces "When Science Gets Graphic" at New York Comic Con.

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    Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    Jonathan Coulton offers up an astonishing one hundred bucks for the purchase of a quantum computer.

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    Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    Comic book author Jim Ottaviani says while science is all about repeatability, precision and accuracy, storytelling about science isn't served well by devotion to including every detail.

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    Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    Charles Soule explains the inspiration for his imaginative mathematical graphic novel "Strange Attractors."

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    Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    The "When Science Gets Graphic" audience smiles at Jonathan Coulton's comment about the hazards of scientific inaccuracies in his song writing. And how willing people are to point them out.

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    Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    "When Science Gets Graphic" audience member asks how we get diverse scientific disciplines like biology more involved in comic books.

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    Science Gets Graphic at New York Comic Con

    Author of "Professor Astro Cat's Frontiers in Space" Dominic Walliman sees a parade of cosplay characters at New York Comic Con.

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  • Big Ideas Series

    The Big Ideas Series features innovative programs that inspire and captivate audiences while exploring some of the most complex of scientific questions, including our origins, our fundamental nature, and our place in the cosmos.

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  • The Moth and WSF series

    The Moth and WSF team up to bring you poignant, hilarious and unpredictable stories of science.

    View Full Series
  • The Heart of Something Complicated

    Normally, when you think about math, the word “creativity” doesn’t readily come to mind. Playing his best devil’s advocate, Robert Krulwich challenges the panel to explain the “beauty” of a formula or the “elegance” of a proof. Is math a kind of art? Can a great mathematical idea be compared to a...

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  • Spotlight: Do Not Touch the Frog

    Strip away the trimmings of a traditional science presentation, add cocktails, and you have WSF Spotlight. Here, ecologist and National Geographic photographer Mark Moffett recounts his unexpectedly hilarious expedition to a remote valley in Colombia to document an elusive and highly poisonous...

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  • The Big, the Small and the Complex

    The Big, the Small, and the Complex is a series exploring the latest developments in astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience—fields recognized by The Kavli Prize. This series is made possible with help from The Kavli Foundation, the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and the Royal...

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  • Cool Jobs: Ecological Adventurer

    Ecologist and explorer Mark Moffett has trekked across the globe to find his stories and capture them on film. Just like the creatures he photographs, Mark can be found crawling in the dirt or clinging to the tops of trees to get that perfect shot. Joined by a scaly friend, he shares his...

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  • Cool Jobs: High-Flying Engineer

    Cool Jobs: Meet the people with the coolest jobs in the world. Nate Ball has always had an appetite for excitement. Growing up, he learned how to build everything from hovercrafts to potato guns to tesla coils. It’s no wonder he went on to become an award-winning mechanical engineer. Here he...

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  • To Remember Better, Build a Mansion in Your Mind

    Joshua Foer, author of Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything, walks us through the process of constructing “memory palaces”—an age-old memorization technique currently exploited by the world’s leading memory champs and mental athletes. Psychologist and memory...

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  • Cool Jobs: The Neuroscientist

    Cool Jobs: Meet the people with the coolest jobs in the world. Watch as neuroscientist André Fenton describes the life of a modern brain scientist, leads a group of students through interactive games, and scans a person’s brain live while explaining what we can learn from its electrical waves.
    See...

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  • Cool Jobs: The Alien Hunter

    Cool Jobs: Meet the people with the coolest jobs in the world. Jill Tarter, director of the SETI Institute, explains how she searches for intelligent life on other planets, what exactly her 42 radio telescopes pick up, and why she needs your eyes and ears to perpetuate her search.
    See more Cool...

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  • Quantum Mechanics Educator Resources

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most amazing and surprising discoveries, ever. While nobody expected it, the microscopic world of atoms and molecules behave in vastly different ways from the objects around us. During the 2013 World Science Festival, the event Spooky Action: The Drama of Quantum...

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  • Meet Wendy Suzuki

    Wendy Suzuki is a neuroscientist who studies a special area of the brain called the hippocampus. It’s small compared to other brain regions, but it plays a pivotal role in memory and spatial navigation. Suzuki specifically studies how exercise has been shown to promote brain growth in this area....

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  • Scientist's Apprentice: Cooking Up Science

    Youth joined food scientist, Julie Goddard, from the University of Massachusetts, to see what’s cooking in a food lab and just how much science you need to know in this yummy apprentice program.

    Scientist's Apprentice: Civil Engineer

    Taught by after school program, Engineering for Kids, apprentices designed, built, and tested their own balsawood bridges and other types of bridges to study structural loads.

    Scientist's Apprentice: Cooking Up Science

    Budding food scientists at work.

    Oceanographer’s Apprentice: Eavesdropping on Whales

    What one apprentice learned about life underwater.

    Scientist's Apprentice: Program and Drive Robots

    Students worked with Roboticist Edwin Olson to program and drive a robot through obstacles and mazes.

    Neuroscientist’s Apprentice: Dissecting Sheep Brains

    A young scientist's first encounter with a real brain.

    Oceanographer’s Apprentice: Eavesdropping on Whales

    A student eagerly awaits his turn to ask a question.

    The Scientist’s Apprentice program gives students the chance to work with leading scientists.

    Upon completion of the workshop, each apprentice received a “Scientist's Apprentice Certificate."

    The Scientist’s Apprentice program gives students the chance to work with leading scientists.

    Students also received a World Science Festival backpack.

  • Baba Brinkman’s Rap Video on Artificial Selection

    How do you turn Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection into a story, especially a story that relates to rap?

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  • Dr. Nora Volkow: Not Your Average General in the War on Drugs

    In honor of International Women’s Day this Saturday #IWD2014, we’re recognizing female pioneers in science. Today, meet Dr. Nora Volkow, whose research on drugs and the brain helped us understand addiction as a disease. Nora Volkow is the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She’s...

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  • Icarus at the Edge of Time Educator Resources

    Download this comprehensive guide to teaching black holes in the classroom. How does gravity work across space? How do black holes form? What is time dilation? Includes stunning images of black holes, a glossary, and classroom activities.

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  • 2012 Cool Jobs Opening Animation

    Carmela & Yonathai, high school students at The NOW Academy, Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools in Los Angeles worked to create this intro for the World Science Festival Cool Jobs event. They together developed the script, characters, and produced all the drawings for this fresh animated short....

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  • RoboCup World Champions Come to Innovation Square
    Deciphering Flight

    Festo's autonomous bionic bird soared above the World Science Festival's tech fest, Innovation Square, on June 2, 2012.

    Don’t Feed The Machines: Take a Tour of a Robot Petting Zoo

    Another amazing Festo creation is the AquaJelly, an autonomous robotic jellyfish with eight mechanical tentacles to propel itself underwater just like the real deal.

    Serpentine Robots

    A robotic snake that can slither up poles (and people) slithered through the crowds at Innovation Square

    Man and Machine

    Come see why Dennis Hong's humanoid was named Time magazine's 2011 Best Invention of the Year.

    Bird Brain

    SmartBird, a massive, autonomous flying contraption straight out of a sci-fi fever dream, buzzed the square every hour.

    Don’t Feed The Machines: Take a Tour of a Robot Petting Zoo

    Mechanical engineer Maurizio Porfiri's robotic fish are convincing enough to swim with real schools of fish.

  • Baba Brinkman’s Rap Video on Artificial Selection

    How do you turn Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection into a story, especially a story that relates to rap?

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  • How Many Stars Are There in the Sky?

    Travel back in time as Galileo Galilei (played by Mike Francis) relates the story of when he first turned his telescope to the sky in order to count the stars—and finds the task more daunting than he expected.

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  • Cool Jobs: Friendly Neighborhood Zoologist

    Jarod Miller is no stranger to animals. As a zoologist, he has traveled the world and met countless members of the animal kingdom. But that’s not enough for him, he wants children to meet them too. With the help of an assistant, Jarod is joined on stage by three of his furry friends, giving the...

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  • Quick: Multiply by 11

    The Mathemagician reveals the surprisingly easy trick behind instantly multiplying any two-digit number by 11. It’s really as simple as 2 + 2.

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  • Cool Jobs: A Mind for Neuroscience

    What do aerobic exercise and memory have in common? According to neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki, more than you think. Her passion for the human brain, memory, and a workout routine called intenSati led her to get people out of their seats and work out for better brain health.
    See more Cool Jobs here

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  • The Best Tickers are Atoms

    When you need a clock of utmost accuracy, you need an atomic clock. Nobel Prize winner William Phillips explains how scientists use atomic clocks to get the most accurate bang for their buck.

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  • Cool Jobs Highlights

    Cool Jobs is an annual jaw-dropping program that occurs both during the week of the Festival and year-round. Cool Jobs brings children face-to-face with world-renowned scientists and their amazing jobs. It inspires young audiences to learn about science, be excited by science and maybe even grow up...

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  • Happy Pi Day from the World Science Festival
    Happy Pi Day from the World Science Festival

    Today is March 14th, 3/14, and so every year we celebrate Pi (π). This year, we decided to do something a little fun, and so here we are, trying to recite as many digits of Pi as possible, with varying degrees of success.

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    Meet WSF Gala Honoree Mary-Claire King, Ground-Breaking Geneticist
    Meet WSF Gala Honoree Mary-Claire King, Ground-Breaking Geneticist
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    Reimagining Science 365 Days A Year
    Reimagining Science 365 Days A Year
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    A Conflict of Principles
    A Conflict of Principles
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    The Making of an Epiphany
    The Making of an Epiphany
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    First Evidence for Primordial Ripples in Space
    First Evidence for Primordial Ripples in Space

    Today’s announcement from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, about the detection of “gravitational waves” emanating from the universe’s first moments, is tremendously exciting, but a little tough for the layman to grasp. We caught up with Brian Greene, in Vancouver to give a...

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    World Physicists React to Gravitational Waves Discovery
    World Physicists React to Gravitational Waves Discovery
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    Spacewalking Made Simple [Infographic]
    Spacewalking Made Simple [Infographic]
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    Where Are They Now: Checking In on Earth’s 25 Active Missions [Infographic]
    Where Are They Now: Checking In on Earth’s 25 Active Missions [Infographic]
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    Multiverse: One Universe or Many?
    Multiverse: One Universe or Many?
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    Can I Catch Face Blindness?
    Can I Catch Face Blindness?

    Is prosopagnosia, commonly called face blindness, a communicable disease? Can you get it from a genetic mutation or just from environmental considerations? Is it a consequence of the natural process of aging—or of the progression of Alzheimer’s? Neurologist Oliver Sacks, who himself is face...

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    Are We Living in a Simulation?
    Are We Living in a Simulation?
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    Among Friends: Removing the Stigma from Hallucination
    Among Friends: Removing the Stigma from Hallucination
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    Persistence of Memory
    Persistence of Memory
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    The Curious Case of Kenneth Parks
    The Curious Case of Kenneth Parks
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    World Physicists React to Gravitational Waves Discovery
    World Physicists React to Gravitational Waves Discovery

    On March 17th, the physics world was rocked by a discovery that may shed light on the wild birth of our universe. Using the BICEP2 telescope at the South Pole, scientists have found what they believe to be the signature of gravitational waves propagating from the rapid expansion of the universe in...

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    Steve Maguire Answers “What is Time?”
    Steve Maguire Answers “What is Time?”
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    Higgs Boson Discovery Wins Nobel Prize for Physics
    Higgs Boson Discovery Wins Nobel Prize for Physics
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    The Problem of Being Almost Consistent
    The Problem of Being Almost Consistent
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    Why Extra Dimensions Make Sense
    Why Extra Dimensions Make Sense
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    World Physicists React to Gravitational Waves Discovery
    World Physicists React to Gravitational Waves Discovery

    On March 17th, the physics world was rocked by a discovery that may shed light on the wild birth of our universe. Using the BICEP2 telescope at the South Pole, scientists have found what they believe to be the signature of gravitational waves propagating from the rapid expansion of the universe in...

    More
    Steve Maguire Answers “What is Time?”
    Steve Maguire Answers “What is Time?”
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    Higgs Boson Discovery Wins Nobel Prize for Physics
    Higgs Boson Discovery Wins Nobel Prize for Physics
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    The Problem of Being Almost Consistent
    The Problem of Being Almost Consistent
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    Why Extra Dimensions Make Sense
    Why Extra Dimensions Make Sense
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    How Do You Make a Nanorobot?
    How Do You Make a Nanorobot?

    Working at a small scale has big challenges. Nanoroboticist Metin Sitti designs and builds microscopic robots that can venture into the human body. Will this advancing nanotechnology revolutionize medicine? Learn more about nanotechnology and watch the full program of Cellular Surgeons: The New...

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    Meet Nanophysicist: Peter Hoffmann
    Meet Nanophysicist: Peter Hoffmann
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    Robot Surgeons You Can Swallow
    Robot Surgeons You Can Swallow
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    Robot’s First Steps
    Robot’s First Steps
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    Are We Ready for Designer Babies?
    Are We Ready for Designer Babies?
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    Why Do We Sleep?
    Why Do We Sleep?

    Why do we sleep? Why do we dream? How conscious are we during sleep and dreams? Neurologist Mélanie Boly explains the important ongoing studies at The Center for Sleep and Consciousness at University of Wisconsin. Watch the excerpt above or see the full program of The Whispering Mind: The...

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    Your Jennifer Aniston Brain Cell
    Your Jennifer Aniston Brain Cell
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    Post-Coma Consciousness
    Post-Coma Consciousness
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    Understanding Monkey Talk
    Understanding Monkey Talk
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    Pandemic: Lessons Learned
    Pandemic: Lessons Learned
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