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The 2014 World Science Festival, which ran from May 28-June 1, delivered more than 70 science-packed events for science enthusiasts of all ages. World-renowned scientists delved into the most cutting-edge theories and research on everything from quantum mechanics to genetic therapy to the search for alien life, NASA astronauts taught us what it’s like to work in space, robots played soccer, and science was celebrated in many ways by hundreds of thousands of attendees.

2014 World Science Festival Programs

Wednesday May 28, 2014

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Date: Wednesday May 28, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM-05:00 PM
Venue: Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
Participants: Artur B. Chmielewski

This summer, a spacecraft named “Rosetta” will rendezvous with the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, having traveled 3.7 billion miles. “Rosetta,” launched in 2004, will attempt a first-ever landing on the comet in November. Join the World Science Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park to see a dynamic installation of a scale replica of the comet.

Wednesday’s schedule includes both general public hours and invitation only programs for schools, detailed below.

General Public. 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Make the comet your destination for a spring day walk through Brooklyn Bridge Park and connect with NASA Jet Propulsion Lab scientists, educators and designers to learn about the Rosetta Mission.

Invitation Only School Programs:
Students learn the amazing ten year story of The Rosetta Mission and how scientists believe our oceans may have come from comets.  They then make their own “kitchen comet.” Suggested for grades 4-8.

If you are an educator and want to bring your students, please email education@worldsciencefestival.com to reserve a slot.

Presented in collaboration with Studio KCA and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Rosetta Mission is a European Space Agency flagship mission with contributions from its member states and NASA.

 

science on a sphere

Date: Wednesday May 28, 2014
Time: 01:00 PM-03:00 PM
Venue: Gould Plaza, NYU
Participants: Hilary Peddicord, Xichen Li, David Holland, Denise Holland

 

See our home planet as you’ve never seen it before: projected and animated on a giant, suspended globe, Science on a Sphere® from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Watch dramatic weather unleash furious historic storms, see special spherical movies about space, tsunamis, and waterfalls, and meet the scientists who study our climate.

Wednesday’s schedule includes both general public hours and invitation only programs for schools, detailed below.

General Public. 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Enjoy your lunch and the afternoon in Science on a Sphere® watching spherical short movies and learning about extreme weather.

Invitation Only School Programs:
What Goes Around Comes Around: Oceans, Atmosphere and Weather: School Excursions—NYU’s Courant Institute and NOAA team up with WSF to teach students how weather systems are created. Students will engage firsthand with scientists for a hands-on learning experience! Suggested for grades 3-5.

If you are an educator and want to bring your students, please email education@worldsciencefestival.com to reserve a slot.

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Date: Wednesday May 28, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-10:00 PM
Venue: NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts
Cast: Francesca Faridany, Cynthia Nixon, Paul Rudd
Writer: Alan Alda
Director: Mark Brokaw
Post Performance Discussion: Alan Alda, Brian Greene

Dear Albert, Alan Alda’s reading for the stage, delves into the treasure trove of letters written by Einstein, tracing an intimate and unfamiliar line across his life and work. Unquestionably one of the greatest – if not the greatest – minds of the 20th century, Einstein was as celebrated for his wit as for his Theory of Relativity. The reading humanizes a giant in the pantheon of great scientists and sheds light upon his momentous scientific insights through first-hand accounts of groundbreaking discoveries.

Dear Albert  features Francesca Faridany (Broadway: Macbeth, Man And Boy, The 39 Steps, The Homecoming) and Cynthia Nixon (Broadway: Rabbit Hole, Wit, The Last Night of Ballyhoo, Indiscretions, Angels in America, The Heidi Chronicles, and The Women) as the women in Einstein’s life, and Paul Rudd (Broadway: The Last Night of Ballyhoo; film: CluelessAnchorman) as Albert Einstein.

This reading for the stage is directed by Obie Award-winning Broadway director Mark Brokaw (Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella, The Lyons, After Miss Julie, Cry-Baby, The Constant Wife and Reckless), and produced by World Science Festival co-founder Tracy Day. After the play, Alda and Festival co-founder Brian Greene will host a discussion on Einstein.

Thursday May 29, 2014

Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 08:00 AM-10:00 AM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Richard Besser
Participants: Alan Alda, Brian Greene, Ann Graybiel, Eric Kandel, Martin Rees, Paul Weiss

The prestigious biennial Kavli Prizes recognize scientists for major advances in three research areas: astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience—the big, the small and the complex. The 2014 winners, sharing a $1 million award in each field, will be announced live via satellite from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in Oslo. The opening conversation, in tribute to the extraordinary philanthropist, the late Fred Kavli, will feature Alan Alda, Brian Greene and Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel. Following the announcement of the winners, three renowned scientists—nanoscientist Paul Weiss , neuroscientist Ann Graybiel and astrophysicist Lord Martin Rees—will join ABC News’ chief health and medical editor Richard Besser for a discussion of the scientific achievements of the Kavli Laureates and provide commentary on the next wave of research and opportunities within these dynamic fields.

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Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM-05:00 PM
Venue: Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
Participants: Artur B. Chmielewski

This summer, a spacecraft named “Rosetta” will rendezvous with the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, having traveled 3.7 billion miles. “Rosetta,” launched in 2004, will attempt a first-ever landing on the comet in November. Join the World Science Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park to see a dynamic installation of a scale replica of the comet.

Thursday’s schedule includes both general public hours and invitation only programs for schools, detailed below.

General Public. 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Make the comet your destination for a spring day walk through Brooklyn Bridge Park and connect with NASA Jet Propulsion Lab scientists, educators and designers to learn about the Rosetta Mission.

Invitation Only School Programs:
Students learn the amazing ten year story of The Rosetta Mission and how scientists believe our oceans may have come from comets.  They then make their own “kitchen comet.” Suggested for grades 4-8.

If you are an educator and want to bring your students, please email education@worldsciencefestival.com to reserve a slot.

Presented in collaboration with Studio KCA and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Rosetta Mission is a European Space Agency flagship mission with contributions from its member states and NASA.

science on a sphere

Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 01:00 PM-03:00 PM
Venue: Gould Plaza, NYU
Participants: Hilary Peddicord, Xichen Li

 

See our home planet as you’ve never seen it before: projected and animated on a giant, suspended globe, Science on a Sphere®  from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Watch dramatic weather unleash furious historic storms, see special spherical movies about space, tsunamis, and waterfalls, and meet the scientists who study our climate.

Thursday’s schedule includes both general public hours and invitation only programs for schools, detailed below.

General Public. 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Enjoy your lunch and the afternoon in Science on a Sphere®  watching spherical short movies and learning about extreme weather.

Invitation Only School Programs:
What Goes Around Comes Around: Oceans, Atmosphere and Weather: School Excursions—NYU’s Courant Institute and NOAA team up with WSF to teach students how weather systems are created. Students will engage firsthand with scientists for a hands-on learning experience! Suggested for grades 3-5.

If you are an educator and want to bring your students, please email education@worldsciencefestival.com to reserve a slot.

Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
Venue: Colloquium Room, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Bill Ritter
Participants: Martin Rees

Great minds inspire greatness in others, which is why the Pioneers in Science program gives high school students from around the globe rare access to some of the world’s most renowned scientists. This year, students will engage with British astrophysicist, Lord Martin Rees. Now the prestigious Astronomer Royal, Rees has worked on everything from black holes and quasars to quantum physics and the Big Bang. During this intimate gathering, he’ll share his personal stories, life challenges, and career highlights, all toward inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers. This program is a partner with Global Nomads Group; Lesson Plan for download [PDF].

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Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 05:30 PM-07:00 PM
Venue: Great Hall of the Cooper Union
Moderator: John Hockenberry
Participants: Sean Carroll, E.L. Doctorow, Jo Marchant, Joyce Carol Oates, Steven Pinker

Whether it’s a literary classic like Frankenstein or the blog posts of a renowned physicist, isn’t all successful science writing, at its core, the result of a compelling narrative? Join these award winning writers in conversation about the wide array of techniques they’re using to humanize science and challenge their readers. We’ll explore how their novels, articles, and best-selling books can offer a path to the rewards of exploring and understanding unknown worlds. This program is supported by The Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books.

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Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 06:00 PM-07:30 PM
Venue: New-York Historical Society
Host: Louise Mirrer
Moderator: Randall Pinkston
Participants: Catherine Ball, Brenna Henn, CeCe Moore, Mark D. Shriver

Researching the farthest branches of your family tree is now faster, cheaper, more accessible and more accurate than ever before. Today you can find distant living relatives, learn how you are related to important historical figures or discover how your ancestors participated in major movements in human history.  And, using advanced technologies to analyze face structure and skin pigmentation, evolutionary geneticists can determine what your ancestors actually looked like.  Join a conversation among leading researchers about how gains in computational power, together with technological innovations, are allowing scientists to come ever closer to understanding how we are all connected.

This program is produced in collaboration with The New-York Historical Society.

Special Note: Participating Penn State geneticist Dr. Mark D.Shriver has organized a unique opportunity to volunteer onsite for his lab’s ongoing genetic genealogy research study.

Additionally, the New-York Historical Society is kindly allowing people free access all day (10 am – 6pm) to the museum for those who show their ticket to this event. That means you can come early, check out the museum’s Patricia D. Klingenstein Library for genealogical research and the N-YHS’s other terrific exhibits and volunteer for Penn State’s research study if you choose.

Cheers to Science

Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 07:00 PM-08:30 PM
Venue: Wythe Hotel, Main Event Hall
Participants: Sam Calagione, Patrick E. McGovern

Join biomolecular archaeologist Patrick McGovern and pioneering brewmaster Sam Calagione as they explore the biotechnology of ancient ales from around the world, and reconstruct an ages-old Nordic Kvasir. Taste the results of chemical, botanical and pollen evidence taken from a 3,500‐year‐old Scandinavian drinking vessel. Observe the results of several kinds of special fermentation to discover just how wild yeast can get. It’s a sensational evening of science, beer and conversation, inspired by the innovative practices of our ancestors.

This program will premiere a special version of Dogfish Head Kvasir fermented with wild yeast.

This program is presented in collaboration with Wythe Hotel, Brooklyn.

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  Join the World Science Festival and the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum for a first of its kind evening that includes a special screening of “Gravity,” under the space shuttle Enterprise, conversations with astronauts, stargazing, a search for exoplanets, after-hours access to the Exploreum Interactive Hall, and more. Astronomy Night: Stargazing, Star Chats and The Hidden Light - Free Break out your telescope or come borrow one of ours during a night of urban stargazing. Join leading astronomers, NASA scientists, astronauts and Intrepid Educators to explore the far-flung wonders of the cosmos. Search for supernovae, track asteroids, or just find your
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The Moth Mercury Rising

Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 07:30 PM-09:00 PM
Venue: Players Club
Participants: Mary-Claire King, Bill Yosses, Brian Hecht, Wendy Suzuki, Hannah Morris

 

In partnership with The Moth, New York’s Peabody Award-Winning storytelling collective, scientists, innovators and artists take to the stage with stories of their personal relationship with science: the ups and downs, inspiration, hurdles, and unexpected twists. In keeping with Moth tradition, all stories must be told within ten minutes, without notes. Their stories are a reminder that science is more than equations or experiments; it is a window to humanity, a quest for understanding, and, often, a way of life.

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Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-10:00 PM
Venue: Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
Moderator: Lynn Sherr
Participants: Bobak Ferdowsi, Sandra Magnus, John M. Grunsfeld

 

Get your fix for drama, space, and beautiful imagery in this special showing of Gravity  in the first-ever screening in the Space Shuttle Pavilion of the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. Immediately following the film, broadcast journalist Lynn Sherr, who is Sally Ride’s biographer, will lead a conversation about the real challenges of space exploration and the everyday oddities of living and working in microgravity. Then join us on the Intrepid Museum’s pier for stargazing, conversations with astronauts and astrophysicists, a search for exoplanets, and more.

Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-09:30 PM
Venue: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
Moderator: Robert Krulwich
Participants: Gary Marcus, John Donoghue, Sheila Nirenberg, Michel M. Maharbiz

We are at the dawn of a revolution in neuroscience, with the potential to dramatically expand how the human mind interacts with the world. For the most part,  brains still need bodies—vocal cords, hands, eyes—to turn thought into action, but rudimentary mind-to-machine links have already been developed. The science fiction dream of uploading new skills and memories directly to your mind, might not be far off. Drawing from neuroscience, biology, engineering, genetics, and psychology, we will explore the breakthroughs happening in brain-machine interaction today, and speculate about the enhanced human capabilities of tomorrow. This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

Date: Thursday May 29, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-09:30 PM
Venue: NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts
Moderator: Brian Greene
Participants: David Z. Albert, Sean Carroll, Sheldon Goldstein, Ruediger Schack

Throw a baseball and you can track its arc across the sky without disturbing it. Scientists don’t have that luxury with quantum particles. When no one is looking, a particle has near limitless potential: it can be nearly anywhere. But measure it, and the particle snaps to one position. This transition from the fuzzy quantum world to the sharp reality of common experience is as vital as it is controversial. How do objects shed their quantum weirdness when measured? Join a debate of current theories, including tales of infinite universes where anything and everything happens. This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

Friday May 30, 2014

Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 09:30 AM-10:30 AM
Venue: Colloquium Room, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Catherine Crier
Participants: Tara M. Ruttley, Mark M. Weislogel, Sandra Magnus

 

In space, water becomes a spherical ball, hovering in the air. Plants grow sideways. Humans lose muscle mass. Without earth’s gravity things behave…well, differently. Such is life—and science—aboard the International Space Station, where the extremes of microgravity make possible a whole new class of cutting-edge experiments ranging from fluid dynamics (try drinking a cup of coffee that won’t stay in the cup) to vaccines, and research about the origin of the life to predicting natural disasters.  ISS scientists join middle school students from across the country in a virtual classroom that brings research at 240 miles above earth’s surface right down to earth.

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Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM-05:00 PM
Venue: Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
Participants: Artur B. Chmielewski

This summer, a spacecraft named “Rosetta” will rendezvous with the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, having traveled 3.7 billion miles from Earth. “Rosetta,” launched in 2004, will attempt a first-ever landing on the comet in November. Join the World Science Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park to see a dynamic installation of a scale replica of the comet.

Friday’s schedule includes both general public hours and invitation only programs for schools, detailed below.

General Public. 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Make the comet your destination for a spring day walk through Brooklyn Bridge Park and connect with NASA Jet Propulsion Lab scientists, educators and designers to learn about the Rosetta Mission.

Invitation Only School Programs:
Students learn the amazing ten year story of The Rosetta Mission and how scientists believe our oceans may have come from comets.  They then make their own “kitchen comet.” Suggested for grades 4-8.

If you are an educator and want to bring your students, please email education@worldsciencefestival.com to reserve a slot.

Presented in collaboration with Studio KCA and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Rosetta Mission is a European Space Agency flagship mission with contributions from its member states and NASA.

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Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Rick Karr
Participants: Kia Nobre, Dean Buonomano, Wendy Suzuki

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

Graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well informed members of the general public are welcome to join the dialogue. Neuroscientists are taking the lead in the study of time and memory, and why our memories so often deceive us. Join an unforgettable conversation about memory, and its relationship to the chemical and electrical impulses of the brain.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 11:30 AM-12:30 PM
Venue: Colloquium Room, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Catherine Crier
Participants: John M. Grunsfeld

 

Great minds inspire greatness in others, which is why the Pioneers in Science program gives high school students from around the globe rare access to some of the world’s most renowned scientists. This year, students will engage with NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld, veteran of five space shuttle flights and multiple spacewalks. Grunsfeld helped repair the Hubble Space Telescope and until recently managed the science program for the James Webb Space Telescope. During this intimate gathering, he’ll share his personal stories, life challenges, and career highlights, all toward inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers.

This program is in partner with Global Nomads Group; Lesson Plan for download [PDF]

science on a sphere

Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 01:00 PM-03:00 PM
Venue: Gould Plaza, NYU
Participants: Hilary Peddicord, Xichen Li

 

See our home planet as you’ve never seen it before: projected and animated on a giant, suspended globe, Science on a Sphere®  from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Watch dramatic weather unleash furious historic storms, see special spherical movies about space, tsunamis, and waterfalls, and meet the scientists who study our climate.

Friday’s schedule includes both general public hours and invitation only programs for schools, detailed below.

General Public. 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Enjoy your lunch and the afternoon in Science on a Sphere®  watching spherical short movies and learning about extreme weather.

Invitation Only School Programs:
What Goes Around Comes Around: Oceans, Atmosphere and Weather: School Excursions—NYU’s Courant Institute and NOAA team up with WSF to teach students how weather systems are created. Students will engage firsthand with scientists for a hands-on learning experience! Suggested for grades 3-5.

If you are an educator and want to bring your students, please email education@worldsciencefestival.com to reserve a slot.

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Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Gary Marcus
Participants: John Donoghue, Michel M. Maharbiz, Bijan Pesaran, Rafael Yuste

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

Imagine a world where scientists could crack the neural code underlying our visual system, create an algorithm, and transfer it to a mechanical robot enabling it to see. What if they could go further and break the codes dictating how we navigate, recognize objects, even think? As we look toward the future, our panelists speculate on how we might transfer the code of our brain to machines and ask what would it take to build a truly “thinking machine”.

This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

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Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 02:30 PM-04:00 PM
Venue: Colloquium Room, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Paul Davies
Participants: David Z. Albert, Sean Carroll, Sheldon Goldstein, Ruediger Schack, Max Tegmark

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

The quantum measurement problem reveals a deep mystery about the fundamental nature of our universe. While many interpretations have been presented—some more popular than others—none fully explain how the world operates on the quantum level. But how can we test these different theories? And what experiments have been done to more successfully bolster a case for one theory over another? Quantum theorists debate how best to get to the bottom of one of the biggest mysteries about the universe.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

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Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 05:15 PM-06:45 PM
Venue: Gerald D. Fischbach Auditorium
Participants: Brian Greene, Jim Baggott

 

What is the difference between evidence, fact, and proof? Can we quantify evidence; is something more evident than something else? What does it take to convince a scientist, a scientific community, and the general public of the correctness of a scientific result in the era of very complicated experiments, big data, and weak signals?

Hosted by the Simons Foundation and John Templeton Foundation, and in collaboration with the World Science Festival, this discussion between Brian Greene and science writer Jim Baggott will address these and related questions. It will be of interest to established researchers, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students and the well-informed general public.

There will be a reception immediately following this event at 6:45.

 

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Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 05:30 PM-08:30 PM
Venue: American Museum of Natural History
Participants: Deborah Blum, Ira Breite, Howard Greller, Lisa G. O’Sullivan, Mark Siddall

 

End your week with an exclusive after-hours tour of the American Museum of Natural History’s popular exhibition The Power of Poison, led by curator Mark Siddall and his merry band of poison experts from the fields of forensics, food, history, literature and medicine, to discover how poison has shaped the course of human history. Then walk, talk and taste your way through the gardens, streets, and shops of Manhattan’s Upper West Side with a scientist-led “poison promenade.” Our final stop is a celebrated neighborhood spot where you can continue the conversation with experts and researchers in an intimate, informal setting.

This event is a production of the World Science Festival presented in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History. Special thanks to the 79th Street Pharmacy for participating in this event.

Please arrive at the Museum of Natural History’s security entrance accessible via a driveway on either side of the main steps on Central Park West.

 

Scientific Kitchen Pie

Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 06:30 PM-09:00 PM
Venue: Momofuku MILK BAR Williamsburg
Participants: Amy Rowat, Christina Tosi, Bill Yosses

The Momofuku Milk Bar bakery becomes a science lab when biophysicist Amy Rowat, Milk Bar founder Christina Tosi, and White House pastry chef Bill Yosses illuminate the sweet science of your favorite dessert. Where the line is drawn between flaky confection and pie disaster often comes down to the proper respect for gluten protein networks and polymorphic phase behavior.  Smell, touch, and taste the science of each step toward a culinary masterpiece while Amy, Christina, and Bill attempt to make these complex concepts as easy as… pie.

AGE 21 AND OVER ONLY

This program is part of the Scientific Kitchen Series – Intimate hands-on food-meets-science workshops behind the scenes at New York’s most  exclusive kitchens and laboratories.

Science on Site

Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 07:00 PM-09:00 PM
Venue: Gould Plaza, NYU
Participants: Emily L. Rice, Bobak Ferdowsi, Caleb Scharf, Emily Rauscher, Statia Cook

 

There’s nothing trivial about the questions in this trivia game night in the Dome at Gould Plaza. Join NASA engineer Bobak Ferdowsi, and other scientists to test your knowledge about the Pale Blue Dot and other worlds. Hosted by Emily Rice of the American Museum of Natural History (aka DJ Carly Sagan of Astronomy on Tap.)

 

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Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 07:30 PM-09:30 PM
Venue: Museum of the Moving Image
Moderator: Sean Carroll
Participants: Mark Levinson, Claudia Raschke-Robinson, David Kaplan, Kyle Cranmer, Maria Spiropulu

Imagine being able to watch as Edison turned on the first light bulb, or as Franklin received his first jolt of electricity. Here’s a film that gives you a front-row seat on one of the most important scientific discoveries of our age: the successful search for the elusive Higgs boson, the final particle to complete the Standard Model of Particle Physics. This inspiring and award-winning documentary follows a handful of the 10,000 scientists who collaborated on the biggest and most expensive scientific experiment in history. After the screening, there will be a live discussion with several of the scientists and filmmakers involved in Particle Fever. This program is supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as part of its Public Understanding of Science and Technology Initiative. This program is presented in collaboration with The Museum of the Moving Image.

Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-09:30 PM
Venue: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
Moderator: Emily Senay
Participants: George Church, Nita A. Farahany, Jamie A. Grifo, Sheldon Krimsky, Paula Amato

Perhaps the most complicated code in the universe is the one sitting inside our cells, written in DNA. More than three billion letters make up the human genome, giving geneticists plenty to explore…and explore they have. But even as gene therapy, DNA analysis, and genetically modified organisms enter the mainstream—and inspire national debate—our capacity to manipulate life continues to deepen. How far should we go? Are there hidden downsides to rewriting our DNA? Can we hijack evolution and put an end to genetic diseases, or engineer the next generation to have advantageous traits? And who gets to decide?

This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

Date: Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-09:30 PM
Venue: NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts
Moderator: Brian Greene
Participants: Andrei Linde, Alan Guth, Amber Miller, John Kovac, Paul Steinhardt

In March, a major breakthrough in understanding the origin of universe took the scientific community–and the general public–by storm. A team lead by astronomer John Kovac, using a powerful telescope at the South Pole, reported evidence of ripples in the fabric of space time produced by the big bang, a long-sought prediction of our most refined approach to cosmology, the inflationary theory. Amidst the worldwide celebration, though, some have been quietly suggesting that the champagne has been uncorked prematurely. Join a singular conversation, among the world’s most respected pioneers in cosmological theory and observation, that will explore the state of the art in the ongoing quest to understand the beginning of the universe. This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

Saturday May 31, 2014

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Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 08:30 AM-05:40 PM
Venue: Colloquium Room, NYU Global Center
Participants: Brian Greene, Maria Spiropulu, Robbert Dijkgraaf, Edward Frenkel, Max Tegmark, Paul Steinhardt

Immerse yourself in an intense and intimate day with some of the foremost experts in physics and mathematics. Modeled on World Science U, the just-launched digital initiative of the World Science Festival, this live program offers a curated curriculum for serious enthusiasts who seek stimulating science that goes beyond a popular-level presentation. From particle physics to cosmology, from the role of mathematics to the basics of string theory, this is a full day to challenge your mind and be guided by a dream-team faculty.  Price is $350 and includes lunch. This program is sold out. 
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Join top science authors for coffee and conversation throughout the day, shop our carefully curated selection of science books for sale, and have your books signed by participating authors. Those who register for the World Science Festival’s free events will receive early notification of special events and be entered for a chance to win a science gift packet. Schedule of Events: Edge @ World Science Festival: Real Scenarios That Keep Scientists Up at Night 11:00 AM What should we be worried about? That is the question John Brockman, founding editor of the celebrated science website Edge, posed in 2013 to our planet’s
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Hack Day: Science in the City

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM-12:00 AM
Venue: MAGNET, NYU School of Engineering
Host: Francois Grey
Participants: Luke DuBois, Dana Karwas, Nancy Hechinger, Michael Flowers, Jin Montclare, Julie Hecht

  Life in the city is complicated, and sometimes the only way to solve an urban problem is with a hack–a science hack, that is.  Science hacks are low-cost, elegant workarounds that create useful scientific projects.  Science Hack Day is a two-day event that brings together scientists, designers, developers and innovators who will invent, build and test their projects. You can participate in two ways: * Join a team over the weekend to produce cool Science Hacks and compete for prizes. You can even submit your own pitch for a Science Hack you’d like others to help you with. * Just stop by
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Science on Site

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 12:00 PM-04:00 PM
Venue: Gould Plaza, NYU
Participants: Victoria Weeks, Hilary Peddicord, Steve Howell, Bill Yosses

 

See our home planet as you’ve never seen it before: projected and animated on a giant, suspended globe, Science on a Sphere®  from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Watch dramatic weather unleash furious historic storms, see special spherical movies about space, tsunamis, and waterfalls, and meet the scientists who study our climate.

This day’s schedule includes:

A full day of interactive weather entertainment and learning, including the spherical films, “Tsunamis” and Water Falls.” Plus interactive presentations about extreme weather, forecasting and a “Best of Science on a Sphere®” seeing the earth at night, Hurricane Sandy, and more.

12pm: Anthropocene – Visualizing Humans as the Dominant Forces of Change on the Planet (NOAA)
12.30pm: Cooking on an Exoplanet – with Steve Howell and Bill Yosses
1.15pm: When the water goes away, run the other way!! Science of TSUNAMIS (NOAA)
1:45pm: Tsunami, a spherical movie
2pm: Cooking on an Exoplanet – with Steve Howell and Bill Yosses
2.45pm: New Horizons, a spherical movie
2:50pm: Water Falls, a spherical movie with introduction by the film maker, Victoria Weeks
3pm: Science on a Sphere film maker Victoria Weeks premieres her new film Pale Blue Dot, and discusses the art of communicating science through film.
3.30pm: The Best of Science on a Sphere” Surface Current, Solar Systems, Air Traffic, Air at Night. Tsunamis (NOAA)

Scientific Kitchen - Chocolate

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 01:00 PM-03:00 PM
Venue: Mast Brothers – Clinton Hill
Participants: The Mast Brothers, Naveen Sinha

Chocolate is a complex system that blends science and art. Look deep into the creation of your sweet obsession with physicist Naveen Sinha and The Mast Brothers. Investigate the physics that leads to chocolate mastery, as well as the fascinating experiments that yield new understanding. Go behind the scenes of The Mast Brothers’ artisanal chocolate-making facilities and use all five senses (especially taste!) to comprehend the scientific processes that turn the seed of a cacao tree into a delicious indulgence.

AGE 21 AND OVER ONLY

This program is part of the Scientific Kitchen Series - Intimate, hands-on, food-meets-science workshops behind the scenes at New York’s most exclusive kitchens and laboratories.

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 02:00 PM-03:30 PM
Venue: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
Moderator: Bill Blakemore
Participants: John Donoghue, Jennifer French, Joseph J. Fins, P. Hunter Peckham

The deaf begin to hear. The blind begin to see. Once damaged hearts begin to pump blood. Forget “wearable tech”—we’ve entered a zone where deploying engineering and circuitry inside the human body can help erase disabilities and, more controversially, enhance human capacities beyond their evolutionary limits. Peek into a future where technology will have the capacity to make us stronger, faster and by some measures, better.

This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

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Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 02:00 PM-03:00 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Participants: Mary-Claire King

Scientists rely on the revelations and discoveries of previous generations. Indeed, it was Isaac Newton who humbly offered that “if he had seen a little further than others, it was by standing on the shoulders of giants.” This year, we continue our special series that invites our audience to stand on the shoulders of modern-day titans, with a speech by geneticist Mary-Claire King. A role model for female scientists, King discovered the breast cancer gene that revolutionized treatment, is a pioneer who first demonstrated the remarkable genetic overlap between humans and chimpanzees, and is an activist who used DNA analysis to reunite war-torn kidnapped children with their families. Come and hear this most remarkable scientist, whose positive impact will be felt for ages to come.

Scientific Sail

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 03:00 PM-05:00 PM
Venue: Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 5
Participants: Frank Nitsche, Margie Turrin

Find your sea legs—and your inner geologist—during one of our daytime sails aboard the schooner Mystic Whaler, departing from Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 5 at 3:00 p.m. On board, geophysicist Frank Nitsche and education coordinator Margie Turrin, both of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, will unveil the underwater history of the Hudson, discuss how we map the ocean depths and trace ice flows, and explain how the moon controls the tides. Raise the sails, cast off, and join the World Science Festival for a stunningly beautiful, deeply informative tour of New York Harbor you’ll never forget.

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Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 04:00 PM-06:00 PM
Venue: NYU Silver Center – Chemistry Lab
Participants: Kent Kirshenbaum, David Grier, Michael Laiskonis

In this comprehensive guide to the science of butter and all its variations, you’ll discover how fat globules, foam, and plasma are essential to the process of making this complex, delicious spread. Examine this soft matter physics phenomenon through NYU professor David Grier’s video microscope. Ask NYU chemist Kent Kirshenbaum why butter that has been fermenting in the ground for a year (or a lifetime) is considered a delicacy. And taste the best and most delicious ways to manipulate and use it thanks to pastry chef and ICE creative director, Michael Laiskonis. You’ll leave with your own handmade butter and an understanding of how and why that happened. AGE 21 AND OVER ONLY This program is part of the Scientific Kitchen Series – Intimate, hands-on, food-meets-science workshops behind the scenes at New York’s most exclusive kitchens and laboratories.

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Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 04:00 PM-05:30 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Mario Livio
Participants: Dimitar Sasselov, Sara Seager, Jack W. Szostak

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

An interdisciplinary study has grown out of the search for the origins of life, and collaborative plans for the next twenty years of this hunt are underway. Our panel will discuss the potential of three high-tech pieces of equipment: Starshade, a flower-shaped shield to block excess light and reveal distant Earth size planets; TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite that will measure the brightness of roughly 500,000 stars; and the famed James Webb Space Telescope, infrared successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The technology will advance the research in many areas of the research. In labs, what do chemists hope to cook up in the next twenty years? Thinking about the future has biologists, astronomers, and physicists alike working collaboratively to be ready for what’s on the horizon.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

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Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 06:00 PM-07:30 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Bill Blakemore
Participants: Joseph J. Fins, John Donoghue, P. Hunter Peckham, Jennifer French, Scott Fessler

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

Advanced prosthetics, pacemakers, and powerful aids like cochlear implants and bionic eyes are blurring the line between man and machine. Merging technology with the human body can help erase disabilities or even enhance the human body beyond its normal capacities.  In fact, the future could be filled with wireless implantable technologies.  Learn how Peckham’s wireless FES (functional electrical stimulation) system restores limb control, and how Donoghue’s wireless, rechargeable, and fully implantable BMI system (Brain/Machine Interface) gives users the ability to control technology with their mind.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

The Moth Story Slam

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 06:00 PM-08:00 PM
Venue: Bell House
Host: Ophira Eisenberg

 

Ten stories, three teams of judges, one winner.  The Moth joins World Science Festival for a science-themed StorySLAM. At the beginning of the show, folks with five-minute stories based on the theme “Boiling Point” will put their names in the hat and ten will be selected to tell. Watch and listen as storytellers woo the audience with tales of heated exchanges, fiery conclusions and transformative moments of truth. Contestants will be judged on sticking to the five-minute time frame, working within the theme, and presenting a story with a coherent structure and resolution.

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Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 07:00 PM-09:00 PM
Venue: NYU Labs/Genomics Lab NYU
Participants: Rachel Meyer, Selena Ahmed, Kevin Denton

Explore the complex and often misunderstood world of botany in a new and delicious way. Follow the scientists of Shoots and Roots on a botanical journey via hand-crafted bitters that showcase plants from biodiversity hotspots around the globe. Use your newfound knowledge along with modern tools and techniques to craft your own high-quality, unique extractions from Earth’s most exotic plants. Enjoy a sensory experience of science enhanced by the vaporized, carbonated and artfully crafted cocktails of Kevin Denton from wd~50 and Alder. Finish with an insider’s peek at the greenhouse above the lab, concluding an evening that’s a beautiful melding of botany and booze.

AGE 21 AND OVER ONLY

This program is part of the Scientific Kitchen Series – Intimate, hands-on, food-meets-science workshops behind the scenes at New York’s most exclusive kitchens and laboratories.

Scientific Sail

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 07:00 PM-09:00 PM
Venue: Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 5
Participants: Frank Nitsche, Margie Turrin

Find your sea legs—and your inner geologist—during one of our daytime sails aboard the schooner Mystic Whaler, departing from Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 5 at 7:00 p.m. On board, geophysicist Frank Nitsche and education coordinator Margie Turrin, both of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, will unveil the underwater history of the Hudson, discuss how we map the ocean depths and trace ice flows, and explain how the moon controls the tides. Raise the sails, cast off, and join the World Science Festival for a stunningly beautiful, deeply informative tour of New York Harbor you’ll never forget.

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-09:30 PM
Venue: NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts
Moderator: John Hockenberry
Participants: Jack W. Szostak, Paul Davies, Sara Seager, Dimitar Sasselov

Are we alone in the universe? Scientists haven’t found aliens yet, but by scanning the sky they’ve shown that our galaxy harbors billions of planets, many of which likely have conditions similar to those on Earth. Which brings new questions into sharp relief: When searching for life beyond our home planet, how do we know what to look for? What human prejudices might cause us to overlook intelligent life forms very different from what we expect? Learn how scientists across disciplines—astronomers, chemists and microbiologists—are intensely studying the evolution of life on Earth to help identify life abroad, a research agenda with wide-reaching ramifications for science, philosophy, religion, and much more. This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 08:00 PM-09:30 PM
Venue: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
Moderator: Elizabeth Vargas
Participants: Nora D. Volkow, Kim D. Janda, Eric Nestler, Amir Levine

Counseling . . . therapy . . . self-control. The path to curing addiction has never been easy. Addiction short-circuits the brain’s reward system, releasing dopamine and other feel-good chemicals that keep you coming back for more. But through a steadily developing understanding of the brain, scientists foresee a future in which a simple medical procedure—even a shot or a pill—could defuse addiction’s power. Join leading researchers studying how addiction changes the very fabric of the brain, and what new insights could mean for addicts trying to win back their lives.

This program is part of “The Big, the Small, and the Complex,” a series exploring the latest developments in Astrophysics, Nanoscience, and Neuroscience—fields recognized by The Kavli Prize. Sponsored by The Kavli Foundation, the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and the Royal Norwegian Consulate General.

Stargazing

Date: Saturday May 31, 2014
Time: 07:00 PM-11:00 PM
Venue: Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
Participants: Bobak Ferdowsi, Michael S. Hopkins, Steve Howell, Mario Livio, Christina Pease

Get out your telescope (or come borrow one of ours) for a night of urban stargazing and live music as we celebrate the dance of the planets. Learn even more about the universe at our Star Chat, where some of the world’s best astronomers, physicists, and scientists will discuss hunting for life, landing crafts on Mars, and discovering planets trillions and trillions of miles away. Gear up for the Rosetta Mission that is slated to land on a comet later this year by visiting our model comet with interactive programming. Finally, get a taste of what it’s like to be an exoplanet hunter with NASA’s interactive game, The Hidden Light, and enjoy finding your favorite constellations without ever leaving the city.

Sunday June 1, 2014

WSU275

Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 09:00 AM-12:30 PM
Venue: Colloquium Room, NYU Global Center
Participants: Alan Guth, Andrei Linde, Michael Turner

Many practitioners have christened ours the golden age of cosmology. Once a field founded on speculation, cosmology has become a data-driven science in which theories of the universe’s origin and evolution must now account for detailed and precise observations. We’ve assembled some of the world’s most celebrated leaders in developing such theories, for an intense half-day program aimed at the serious enthusiast who seeks an immersion that goes beyond a popular-level presentation. Modeled on World Science U, the just-launched digital initiative of the World Science Festival, this live program is a rare opportunity to learn from the very scientists who have shaped our generation’s most lasting contributions to cosmological thought.

Please note: While this program does not have formal prerequisites, a portion of the material presented will make use of algebra and basic calculus.

Doors open at 8:30 AM

Hack Day: Science in the City

Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM-06:00 PM
Venue: MAGNET, NYU School of Engineering
Host: Francois Grey
Participants: Luke DuBois, Dana Karwas, Nancy Hechinger, Michael Flowers, Jin Montclare, Julie Hecht

Life in the city is complicated, and sometimes the only way to solve an urban problem is with a hack–a science hack, that is.  Science hacks are low-cost, elegant workarounds that create useful scientific projects.  Science Hack Day is a two-day event that brings together scientists, designers, developers and innovators who will invent, build and test their projects. You can participate in two ways: * Join a team over the weekend to produce cool Science Hacks and compete for prizes. You can even submit your own pitch for a Science Hack you’d like others to help you with. * Just
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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM-06:00 PM
Venue: Washington Square Park
Participants: Michael J. Massimino, Bobak Ferdowsi, Michael S. Hopkins

Join us for a free full day of hands on experiences with Robots, Space, and Weather. Explore science with NASA, NOAA, and dozens of others through interactive experiments and installations, simulators, and performances, designed to inspire people of all ages.
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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 10:30 AM-11:45 AM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Todd Disotell

 

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious.

Get up close and personal with yourself by extracting DNA from your own spit! Every cell in your body contains a copy of the instructions that make you…well, you. Your DNA determines everything from the color of your hair to whether you’ll enjoy certain foods, as well as more serious things like whether you’re likely to contract a certain disease. Come take a peek at your own fascinating genome, and learn how scientists examine DNA for everything from solving crimes to improving tomatoes to tracing your ancestors.

This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators.

Ages: 6th grade and above

This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

 

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Steven Strogatz
Participants: James Fowler, Seth Lloyd, Andrew W. Lo, Simon Levin

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

What do our bodies, financial markets, fisheries, and the world’s food supply have in common? They are all complex systems that, under stress, can collapse catastrophically without warning. Scientists today are looking to mathematical models to help predict instability in a system before it’s on the verge of collapse. Could there be a universal set of rules that apply across different systems? If so what do these models tell us about the state of our world?

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Tim Chartier

 

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious.

Ever wanted to be a fortune-teller? Bracketologists combine the fun of sports with the logic and statistics of math to try to predict the future and win bragging rights. Davidson College math professor Tim Chartier, a contributor to ESPN’s Sports Science, uses formulas and code to make very smart predictions about which team will come out on top during NCAA “March Madness” basketball games—and he’s right more often than most. He’ll demonstrate tricks and techniques for applying statistics to public scores and rankings to help you compile smart brackets. Using his methodology will help you dominate the competition in the tournament next March, and anywhere else that extremely educated guessing comes in handy.

This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators.

Ages: 7th grade and above

This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 11:30 AM-12:45 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Wendy Suzuki

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious. Time to get your gloves on: When you start taking things apart to understand how they work, science can get pretty messy. Neuroscientists often find themselves slicing brains for analysis under a microscope, or cutting into them in search of damaged areas. Now it’s your turn! NYU neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki guides your hand as you dissect a sheep’s brain to identify some common features that can be found in human brains as well, like the hypothalamus and thalamus. Bring your curiosity and thirst for adventure—we’ll provide the scalpels. This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators. Ages:2nd grade and above This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 12:00 PM-04:00 PM
Venue: Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
Participants: Artur B. Chmielewski

This summer, a spacecraft named “Rosetta” will rendezvous with the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, having traveled 3.7 billion miles. “Rosetta,” launched in 2004, will attempt a first-ever landing on the comet in November. Join the World Science Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park to see a dynamic installation of a scale replica of the comet.

Sunday’s schedule includes general public hours, detailed below.

General Public. 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Make the comet your destination for a spring day walk through Brooklyn Bridge Park and connect with NASA Jet Propulsion Lab scientists, educators and designers to learn about the Rosetta Mission.

Presented in collaboration with Studio KCA and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Rosetta Mission is a European Space Agency flagship mission with contributions from its member states and NASA.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 12:00 PM-01:15 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: David Grier

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious. Your favorite song, a goofy laugh, the drip of a leaky faucet: Sound literally surrounds us, and bombards us with competing waves, every minute of the day. Let NYU physics professor David Grier rattle your eardrums with hands-on experiments in understanding how we sort out the chaos. How does changing the way vibrations travel transform a sound and the way we experience it? How is it possible there are certain sounds we can’t hear at all? Engage all your senses as you bounce laser beams off mirrors, send pulses through tubes, and learn to decipher the wild and noisy, but satisfyingly predictable, world of sound. This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators. Ages: Elementary School This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

 

Imagine exploring the Amazon river to dig up a rare breed of leeches, or heading into space to repair the famed Hubble Space Telescope, or crawling through a tiny crevice in the Earth in search of remains of our earliest ancestors. Well, you don’t have to just imagine these spectacular feats. The World Science Festival has assembled the coolest group of scientists with the most interesting jobs on the planet, who’ll tell you first hand about these explorations and much more. Join us to start your own quest to find a Cool Job in science.

Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 01:00 PM-02:30 PM
Venue: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
Moderator: John Hockenberry
Participants: Lila Davachi, Dean Buonomano, David Eagleman, Kia Nobre

The first minute of a roller coaster ride and the ninety-seventh minute in line at the DMV don’t seem to pass at quite the same rate. While our watches show time ticking forward at a uniform pace, the experience of time is anything but. Time is relative–not just in an Einsteinian way—but because the brain colors and shades the passage of time. Through an interdisciplinary discussion among some of the worlds leading researchers, explore the human experience of time, including the fascinating relationship between memory and reality, and the chemical and electrical impulses of the brain that drive the experience. This program is part of the Big Ideas series.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 01:00 PM-02:30 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Rick Karr
Participants: Ann B. Beeder, Nora D. Volkow, Kim D. Janda, Eric Nestler

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

Research by some of the world’s leading neuroscientists is helping us better understand how addiction affects the brains of both adolescents and adults, and that the key to beating addiction goes far beyond just saying “no”. Yet, even with such progress, decisions by policy makers and health care professionals may be hurting the fight against addiction more than they’re helping. Join us for a conversation about science and public policy, informed by the latest discoveries. This Kavli Neuroscience program will explore the gap between what we know and what we think we know about addiction.

This program is part of “The Big, the Small, and the Complex,” a series exploring the latest developments in Astrophysics, Nanoscience, and Neuroscience—fields recognized by The Kavli Prize. Sponsored by The Kavli Foundation, the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and the Royal Norwegian Consulate General.

 

 

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 01:15 PM-02:30 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Tim Chartier

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious. Every time a player scores a goal, makes a pass, or takes a foul, lots of data gets generated. How well is that player doing per minute of game time? How about the team as a whole? How often does the team win when Number Six plays? Mathematicians and analysts are finding new and interesting ways to sift through all of this data to make predictions. Guesswork and gut feeling may not always be enough to pick the winner. Learn how to use statistics and math to your advantage and soon you’ll be forecasting with the best of them. This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators. Ages: 4th grade and above This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 01:30 PM-02:45 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Dana Karwas

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious. It’s your turn to help make history. Join NYU School of Engineering’s Dana Karwas in using creative data tools to take history out of textbooks and into an interactive adventure. You’ll take photos and provide descriptions for an application that will turn any phone into a mobile history portal, letting people explore hidden facts about their urban surroundings. You’ll help make history more accessible and relevant, so it’s easier for people to learn about (and learn from) the past. This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators. Ages: 5th grade and above; students need to bring their smartphone or tablet. This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 02:00 PM-04:00 PM
Venue: NYU Kimmel Center, 2nd Floor
Participants: Steve Metzger, “Science Bob” Pflugfelder, Deborah Heiligman

 

Join us for a special storytime where top kids authors read from their books, all afternoon. Shop our carefully curated collection of kids’ science books for sale and have your books signed by participating authors.

Those who register for the World Science Festival’s free events will receive early notification of special events and be entered for a chance to win a science gift package.


Pluto Visits Earth!: What Does It Mean To Be A Planet?
2:00 – 2:30

Steve Metzger, a former teacher, is the author of more than 60 children’s books, including Detective Blue (2014 Colorado Children’s Book Award Nominee), The Falling Leaves, and The Way I Act. His latest picture book is Pluto Visits Earth! (2013 Children’s Choice Book Award Nominee and 2013 ABC Best Books for Children). In this interplanetary adventure, Pluto is angry at being downgraded to a dwarf planet. He journeys through the solar system to plead his case to astronomers on Earth, asking other planets to join him. Hilarious illustrations by Jared Lee (The Black Lagoon series).

Featuring: Steven Metzger, Pluto Visits Earth!


One Plus One for Boys and Girls
2:45 – 3:15

Deborah Heiligman reads from and discusses her book The Boy Who Loved Math, about the famously eccentric mathematician Paul Erdős. Though many people think of mathematicians as solitary, little Paul never followed the usual path… This book won the 2014 Cook Prize for Best STEM Picture Book.

Featuring: Deborah Heiligman, The Boy Who Loved Math


What About (Science) Bob?
3:30 – 4:00

“Jimmy Kimmel Live!” regular and best-selling author “Science Bob” demonstrates his campaign for “Random Acts of Science” and tells entertaining tales about Nick and Tesla a pair of eleven-year olds with a knack for science, technology and getting into trouble!

Featuring: “Science Bob” Pflugfelder, Nick and Tesla’s Secret Agent Gadget Battle

 

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 02:00 PM-03:15 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Todd Disotell

 

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious.

Get up close and personal with yourself by extracting DNA from your own spit! Every cell in your body contains a copy of the instructions that make you…well, you. Your DNA determines everything from the color of your hair to whether you’ll enjoy certain foods, as well as more serious things like whether you’re likely to contract a certain disease. Come take a peek at your own fascinating genome, and learn how scientists examine DNA for everything from solving crimes to improving tomatoes to tracing your ancestors.

This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators.

Ages: 6th grade and above

This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

 

2014_citizen_275

Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 03:00 PM-04:15 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Jared Lamenzo

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious. Did you know your smartphone can help you make the world a better place? Find out how! Crowdsourcing apps give you everything you need to become a volunteer scientist, gathering real data that can be used in important scientific analysis. By identifying and recording what you see—birds, flowers, trees, insects, wildlife, stars, and more—you can help scientists track habitat shifts, climate change, and population fluctuations, and generally understand the world around us a little better. Bring your phone or borrow our Google glasses to document species in Washington Square Park and start your journey as a citizen scientist. This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators. Ages: 4th grade and above; students should bring their smartphone if they have one. This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 03:00 PM-04:15 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: David Grier, Kent Kirshenbaum

The Apprentice program are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious. Examples of soft matter—things easily deformed by changes in temperature—are all around us, including milk and butter. Chemists and physicists are intrigued by the unique properties of these materials. How can fat and water, which are clear and don’t mix, combine to form white, creamy milk? Using lasers and holograms (yes, you read that correctly), NYU physics professor David Grier and NYU chemistry professor Kent Kirshenbaum lead a fun and futuristic workshop showcasing how we can make and manipulate these fascinating everyday materials. This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators. Ages: 3rd grade and above This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 03:15 PM-04:30 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Alvar Saenz-Otero

 

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious.

If you’ve always dreamed of working with a team of robots to control a satellite in space—and who hasn’t?—now’s your chance. Right now, robots called SPHERES inside the orbiting International Space Station are taking web-browser commands from Earthlings below, testing how things navigate in microgravity. MIT’s Zero Robotics cofounder Alvar Saenz-Otero will teach you how to write code to order the SPHERES around, and let you run simulations to see how well your code would work. You can immediately put your newfound knowledge to work solving challenges and competing in tournaments to program the robots; finalists get to control the real SPHERES on the ISS.

This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators.

Ages: 5th grade and above

This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

 

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 03:30 PM-04:45 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Wendy Suzuki, Jody Oberfelder

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious. People used to believe that the right half of the brain produced creativity and art, while the left brain dominated all things mathematical and logical. The reality’s more complex, as you’ll learn when you join NYU neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki for an interactive class on how the brain is affected by movement. You’ll dissect your own brain, so to speak, learning what our neurons are really doing when we move and dance. And you’ll gain new insights into how different parts of the brain interact and work together while choreographing dances. Bring an open mind…and both halves of your brain. This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators. Ages: 4th grade and above This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 03:45 PM-05:00 PM
Venue: Scientist’s Apprentice Central
Participants: Hannah Morris, Becca Peixotto

 

The Apprentice programs are small, hands-on workshops in which enthusiastic renowned scientists in interesting fields educate the curious.

Are you prepared to dig into ancient human history? Join two members of an all-female excavation team who wriggled their way through tight tunnels into ancient caves to investigate an incredible find of early hominid remains. Besides hearing this amazing discovery story from the explorers who lived it, students will learn how to safely unearth and preserve historical artifacts with cool 3-D scanning technology, using reflected light to make a model of your find without touching it.

This is a drop-off workshop where young scientists learn directly from leading scientists, technologists, and innovators.

Ages: 3rd grade and above

This program is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 04:00 PM-05:30 PM
Venue: Grand Hall, NYU Global Center
Moderator: Emily Senay
Participants: George Church, Farren Isaacs, Paula Amato, Sheldon Krimsky, Jef Boeke

 

The World Science Festival’s annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival’s premiere public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty and well-informed members of the general public.

In several groundbreaking studies researchers are creating new genomes inside of bacteria, testing the very limits of genetic engineering and literally creating new letters for life’s alphabet. How do researchers modify A, C, G and T? How do they create life beyond the code we know? What are the consequences?  Geneticists George Church and Farren Isaacs share their latest work and discuss the cutting edge developments in genetic engineering.  What are the risks involved in creating entirely new genomes? Who should regulated this research, and how?

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 04:00 PM-05:30 PM
Venue: NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts
Moderator: Alan Alda
Participants: David Eagleman, Kaitlyn Hova, Bevil Conway, Jay Neitz

How do you see colors, and do they look the same to everyone? It’s not an easy question. Most human eyes can see around 10 million different colors, but our eyes can’t see other spectra of light that many insects, birds, and fish can see. Some colors even look different when your brain compares them to other colors, something painters such as Monet and Matisse took advantage of.  And some people, synesthetes, can invent colors to go along with words, numbers, or even music. In an action-packed hour, our audience and experts will delve into the world of color. It all leads up to a dazzling sound and light show, helping us see the colors a young synesthete has in her head when she rocks out on the electric violin. This program is in association with the Flame Challenge, an annual contest held by The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.

Date: Sunday June 1, 2014
Time: 05:00 PM-06:30 PM
Venue: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
Moderator: Ira Flatow
Participants: James Fowler, Steven Strogatz, Andrew W. Lo, Seth Lloyd

Algorithms are the unsung heroes of everything from fighting crime and searching the world’s information to selecting movies and even choosing mates. These complex digital decision-making mechanisms mine mountains of data to make predictions for, well, nearly anything. And analysts thus armed are revealing unexpected connections between widely disparate systems. Join an exploration of the surprising predictive power of math, and probe the theoretical limits of even the most promising computers of tomorrow. We’re tackling ever more complex problems-but are there some problems simply beyond the reach of machines? This program is part of the Big Ideas series.