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Past Events

Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
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Scientific MentorAlyssa Loorya

Construction workers at Washington Square Park recently found two burial vaults from the early 1800s. Now is your chance to uncover New York City history just like scientists do. Join archaeologist Alyssa Loorya to reconstruct artifacts, piece together pottery, and create a map of archaeological sites throughout the city. The program concludes with a walk to the area where the burial vault was discovered at Washington Square Park East. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Scientific MentorCaroline Bragdon

It’s hard to find a New Yorker who hasn’t encountered a rat. They are notoriously clever and hard to control. Thankfully, the scientists at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene are regularly tracking and developing new ways to control our rodent neighbors. You won’t come face-to-face with any rats at this program, but you’ll join research scientist Caroline Bragdon to examine gadgets, track population growth with interactive maps, and search for signs of rodent activity in the local park. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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This program is sold out. Join the waitlist for alerts if tickets become available.

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Scientific MentorRussell Burke

What do turtles, lizards, and coyotes all have in common? They call the New York City area their home. Join Hofstra University biology professor Russell Burke on a journey to study the behavior of our furry and not so furry neighbors. Participate in a study to learn how scientists capture, mark, and release animals to determine their populations in our backyard. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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The World Science Festival’s highly celebrated program, Cool Jobs, is back with an astounding line-up of the coolest science teachers around. Can you break a cinder block on your chest? Dance your way into learning about fossils? Play catch with a robot? These are all things that these people do every day…at work. And all because they know how to make science the most exciting thing around. Come experience their passion during an interactive performance you will not want to miss.

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What better way to inspire the next generation of women scientists than to meet working scientists, tour their labs, and learn about their paths to awe-inspiring careers? Women in labs from anthropology, neuroscience, physics, and more open their doors to NYC high school girls at universities throughout the city. Students have the rare opportunity to interact with prominent scientists, experiment with state-of-the-art equipment, and gain insight into the steps they can take now to prepare for successful future in science.

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Scientific MentorErin Styfco

Building a skyscraper takes more than just an architectural drawing. You have to take into account materials, location, ground structure, and weather. Engineer Erin Styfco leads an exploration of how natural processes — from wind and rain to natural disasters — can affect structures over time. Recreate an earthquake to determine what causes buildings to collapse, and construct your own structure designed to survive the elements.

This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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ModeratorCarl Zimmer

As a discipline, science aspires to be an evidence-based, non-partisan tool for revealing truth. But science is carried out by scientists, human beings like the rest of us, subject to pressures, preconceptions, and biases. What are the external, non-scientific forces that impact scientific research? Does the current research structure — from government and foundation grant making to peer review and the stiff competition for limited funding — drive focus away from the scientific objective of unbiased exploration? What lessons can we draw from the recent crisis of reproducibility afflicting some research areas? Join an open discussion focused on the myriad factors scientists face in a highly competitive environment as they seek to uphold and advance the ideals of scientific exploration.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ModeratorMario Livio

Leading physicists, astronomers, and astrophysicists discuss how they are pushing the boundaries of scientific imagination to develop experiments that test the seemingly untestable theories of multiverses, eternal inflation, and exotic particles. Join the conversation about their plans to recreate the big bang in particle accelerators here on Earth, as well as their quest to sift through signals from the farthest edges of space for the existence of a multiverse. The stakes are high — as they attempt to answer some of science’s biggest questions, they are testing the limits of experimental and observational science itself.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ModeratorAndrew Revkin

Increased standards of living and a global population set to double by 2050 mean skyrocketing demands for energy, resources, and technology. Nanotechnology holds perhaps the biggest promise for finding solutions: From computing, communications, renewable energy and clean water, to medicine, transportation, skincare, sports clothing and food, countless tiny particles, visible only in a microscope, are at work beneath the surface of our daily lives. With so many areas going nano, is it really good for us? Join a group of experts who will explore this emerging area of collaborative research seeking to meet vital challenges while engineering a healthier, safer, and more efficient future.

The Kavli Prize recognizes scientists for their seminal advances in astrophysics, nanoscience, and neuroscience. The series, “The Big, the Small, and the Complex,” is sponsored by The Kavli Foundation and The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

Image Credit: Ariana Levitt, Drexel University, NanoArtography Competition 2016 winner

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Ride a hovercraft, control an underwater rover, and face off with virtual reality dinosaurs. This is Ultimate Science Sunday, an action-packed day of robots, catapults, wind tunnels, telescopes, and so much more! Explore floors of interactive exhibits, demonstrations, and games during this immersive science event that you won’t want to miss. This indoor event is free and open to all ages.

Presented by Con Edison.

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Books come to life in this special day-long science and story series. Meet top authors of children’s science books and students as young as eight who have won some of the world’s top awards. Then, have your books signed by participating authors and join students at Ultimate Science Sunday to interact with their projects.

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Imagine navigating the globe with a map that only sketched out the continents. That’s pretty much how neuroscientists have been operating for decades. But one of the most ambitious programs in all of neuroscience, the Human Connectome Project, has just yielded a “network map” that is shedding light on the intricate connectivity in the brain. Join leading neuroscientists and psychologists as they explore how the Connectome promises to revolutionize treatments for psychiatric and neurological disorders while also answering profound questions regarding the electrochemical roots of memory and behavior, the link between experience and perception, and perhaps the very nature of consciousness itself.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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