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World Science Festival 2017

Tuesday, May 30, 2017
7:00 pm - 8:15 pm
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
7:00 pm - 11:00 pm
Wednesday, May 31, 2017
Wednesday, May 31, 2017
7:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Wednesday, May 31, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Thursday, June 1, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017
8:30 pm - 10:00 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
Friday, June 2, 2017
8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Friday, June 2, 2017
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
11:45 am - 12:45 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
7:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Friday, June 2, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
Saturday, June 3, 2017
9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Saturday, June 3, 2017
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Saturday, June 3, 2017
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Saturday, June 3, 2017
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Saturday, June 3, 2017
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
12:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
7:00 pm - 11:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

The tenth World Science Festival opens with a new work celebrating the human spirit of exploration, discovery, and creativity. Told by acclaimed physicist Brian Greene as a cosmic journey that wends its way from the Big Bang to the end of time, the evening features an exceptional and eclectic group of performers including famed violinist Joshua Bell, renowned opera star Renée Fleming, the innovative dance troupe Pilobolus, and singer David Draiman from the iconic hard rock band Disturbed, among others. The evening is a celebration of science and art examining our collective longing to transcend the boundaries of space and time.

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Celebrating the tenth anniversary of the World Science Festival, the 2017 Gala commences with the Festival’s Opening Night premiere of Time, Creativity, and the Cosmos, featuring Joshua Bell, David Draiman, Renée Fleming, Brian Greene, and the dance innovators Pilobolus. Following the performance, Gala guests will enjoy a seated dinner and after-party festivities offering science-inspired delicacies, molecular mixology and out-of-this-world desserts.

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This program is sold out. A small number of tickets will be available at the venue 30 minutes prior to the event on a first-come-first served basis. Join the waitlist to be alerted if tickets become available sooner.

Sold Out

The World Science Festival brings science to the crossroads of the world, Times Square. From May 31 – June 3, the Festival will descend on Times Square with activities, demonstrations, and installations that educate, entertain, and inspire, providing the public a greater appreciation of our ever-changing planet — and our relationship to it. The programming includes a large LED video wall that powerfully illustrates how global warming is fundamentally changing the earth’s topography; climate talks; and the Sustainable Dance Floor, an innovative dance floor that generates power from human activity. The Sustainable Dance Floor will be open to the public from 7am – 11:59pm. Each day, from 10am – 6pm, guests will be invited to join in for a variety of energy generating games, fitness and dance classes and even a chance to charge their phones through their own movement.

The centerpiece of Science in the Square is Holoscenes, an epic performance-installation that viscerally connects everyday actions to climate change. Born of the widely-shared concern that water — from rising seas, intensifying floods, and extended droughts — will be a defining issue of the 21st century, Holoscenes takes place in a twelve ton glass aquarium which, over the course of five hours each day, periodically floods and drains, requiring a rotating cast of performers to creatively respond to changing levels of water. Holoscenes will be performed from 6pm to 11pm, June 1 – 3.

The Sustainable Dance Floor is developed by Energy Floors.

Holoscenes was created by Lars Jan and Early Morning Opera. It is co-presented by World Science Festival and Times Square Arts, and was originally produced by MAPP International Productions. This presentation of Holoscenes is supported by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Climate Talks at Science in the Square featured: Bill Blakemore, Ted Blanco, James Bronzan, Jeremy Deaton, David Doubilet, Sylvia Earle, Eddie Goldstein, Justin Brice Guariglia, Lars Jan, Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Brian Kahn, Josh Landis, Cassie Lee, Anders Levermann, Suzanne Miller, Stephanie Pfirman, Andrew Revkin, Dan Rizza, Cynthia Rosenzweig, Gavin Schmidt, Ellen Stofan, and Ben Straus.

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R. Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller captured the world’s imagination with designs like the geodesic dome, but perhaps his greatest contribution was the way he thought. As a “design scientist,” he sought innovation that benefits the greatest number of people using the least amount of resources. Today’s disruptive designers are guided by the same principles, uniting science and design for a sustainable future. Join Academy Award-winner Ellen Burstyn, a friend of Bucky’s, for a special advance screening of her new film The House of Tomorrow (also starring Nick Offerman, Asa Butterfield, Alex Wolff, Maude Apatow, and Michaela Watkins), which tells Bucky’s incredible story through two rebel teens trying to become punk gods. Following the film, moderator John Hockenberry, Ms. Burstyn, director Peter Livolsi, and winners of the prestigious “Buckminster Challenge,” will discuss how Bucky’s limitless thinking is just what we need today.

The House of Tomorrow is the recipient of a 2015 Tribeca Film Institute/Sloan Filmmaker Fund Screenplay Development Award.

This program is co-presented with the Museum of the Moving Image and Sloan Science & Film. Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as part of its Public Understanding of Science and Technology Program.

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ModeratorJohn Schaefer

Today, there are robots that make art, move like dancers, tell stories, and even help human chefs devise unique recipes. But is there ingenuity in silico? Can computers be creative? A rare treat for the senses, this thought-provoking event brings together artists and computer scientists who are creating original works with the help of artificially intelligent machines. Joined by leading experts in psychology and neuroscience, they’ll explore the roots of creativity in humans and computers, what artificial creativity reveals about human imagination, and the future of hybrid systems that build on the capabilities of both.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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The World Science Festival brings science to the crossroads of the world, Times Square. From May 31 – June 3, the Festival will descend on Times Square with activities, demonstrations, and installations that educate, entertain, and inspire, providing the public a greater appreciation of our ever-changing planet — and our relationship to it. The programming includes a large LED video wall that powerfully illustrates how global warming is fundamentally changing the earth’s topography; climate talks; and the Sustainable Dance Floor, an innovative dance floor that generates power from human activity. The Sustainable Dance Floor will be open to the public from 7am – 11:59pm. Each day, from 10am – 6pm, guests will be invited to join in for a variety of energy generating games, fitness and dance classes and even a chance to charge their phones through their own movement.

The centerpiece of Science in the Square is Holoscenes, an epic performance-installation that viscerally connects everyday actions to climate change. Born of the widely-shared concern that water — from rising seas, intensifying floods, and extended droughts — will be a defining issue of the 21st century, Holoscenes takes place in a twelve ton glass aquarium which, over the course of five hours each day, periodically floods and drains, requiring a rotating cast of performers to creatively respond to changing levels of water. Holoscenes will be performed from 6pm to 11pm, June 1 – 3.

The Sustainable Dance Floor is developed by Energy Floors.

Holoscenes was created by Lars Jan and Early Morning Opera. It is co-presented by World Science Festival and Times Square Arts, and was originally produced by MAPP International Productions. This presentation of Holoscenes is supported by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Climate Talks at Science in the Square featured: Bill Blakemore, Ted Blanco, James Bronzan, Jeremy Deaton, David Doubilet, Sylvia Earle, Eddie Goldstein, Justin Brice Guariglia, Lars Jan, Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Brian Kahn, Josh Landis, Cassie Lee, Anders Levermann, Suzanne Miller, Stephanie Pfirman, Andrew Revkin, Dan Rizza, Cynthia Rosenzweig, Gavin Schmidt, Ellen Stofan, and Ben Straus.

Learn MoreFree Admission

During this invitation only event, a limited global audience of students and lifelong learners hailing from more than a dozen countries — Brazil to Israel and Canada to South Africa — will participate in a live interactive virtual reality lecture that explores such topics as extra dimensions, unified theory of physics and the multiverse. The VR audience will engage in the social experience of a worldwide virtual classroom, while creating and handling higher dimensional objects that stretch the bounds of what’s possible in a real environment.

The original VR broadcasting is presented in collaboration with Abelana VR Productions, and eighteen international VR centers and theaters. Venue support provided by Jump Into The Light.

Learn MoreInvitation Only

Thanks to evolution, your body is exquisitely adapted to survive on Earth—and, as far as we know, nowhere else. But while humanity’s past is firmly grounded on our home planet, the humans of the future may live on the moon, Mars, or interstellar ships bound for distant worlds. To prepare for this cosmic migration, today’s scientists are exploring how living in space affects the human body—right down to DNA—and whether we might tweak our own genome to enhance our ability to live beyond Earth. Come explore the biological future of humanity, as a new era of evolution beckons.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ParticipantsAlan Alda, Tina Fey

For more than a decade, Alan Alda has been successfully working with scientists to greatly sharpen their ability to communicate with each other and with the general public. The approach? Getting researchers, from quantum physicists to molecular biologists to nanotechnologists, to drop the jargon and pick up improvisational theatre. Join us for a wild ride as two comedic heroes explore the power of theatre, satire, humor and empathy to reshape the fine art of communication.

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ModeratorEmily Senay

Synthetic blood mass-produced to meet supply shortages. Livers and kidneys “bioprinted” on demand. Missing fingers and toes re-grown with a jolt of bioelectricity. Regenerative medicine promises to do more than just treat disease, injuries, or congenital conditions. It holds the potential to rejuvenate, heal, or completely replace damaged tissue and organs. If successful, regenerative medicine will have immense impact on how we care for the injured, sick, and aging — and how we think about death. This program will explore mind-boggling medical advances as well as the societal and economic implications of a future in which everybody may truly be forever young.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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It’s a profound question facing modern humans: Are we still subject to natural selection? After hundreds of years of scientific progress, many of the pressures that control evolution—predators and disease—are decreasing. At the same time, technology capable of engineering the genome is in our hands. Are we undergoing a new form of evolution in which artificial changes are faster and more radical than those produced by the natural world? Should we control our own genetic material? Where will these changes lead us? Renowned geneticists, paleoanthropologists, and biologists consider our genetic future as evolution evolves.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Strip away the trimmings of a traditional science presentation, add cocktails, and you have the WSF Spotlight. An intimate, cabaret-style setting provides an unobstructed glimpse into the minds of some of the more intrepid scientists who happen to be women. What does it take to do the work they do? Come hear stories of trial and triumph at a science happy hour featuring one-of-a-kind talks that promise to entertain, engage, and enlighten.

Admission includes one complimentary drink.

Copies of Mayim Bialik’s new book Girling Up: How to be Strong, Smart and Spectacular will be on sale for a book signing after the event.

Learn MoreSold Out

The World Science Festival brings science to the crossroads of the world, Times Square. From May 31 – June 3, the Festival will descend on Times Square with activities, demonstrations, and installations that educate, entertain, and inspire, providing the public a greater appreciation of our ever-changing planet — and our relationship to it. The programming includes a large LED video wall that powerfully illustrates how global warming is fundamentally changing the earth’s topography; climate talks; and the Sustainable Dance Floor, an innovative dance floor that generates power from human activity. The Sustainable Dance Floor will be open to the public from 7am – 11:59pm. Each day, from 10am – 6pm, guests will be invited to join in for a variety of energy generating games, fitness and dance classes and even a chance to charge their phones through their own movement.

The centerpiece of Science in the Square is Holoscenes, an epic performance-installation that viscerally connects everyday actions to climate change. Born of the widely-shared concern that water — from rising seas, intensifying floods, and extended droughts — will be a defining issue of the 21st century, Holoscenes takes place in a twelve ton glass aquarium which, over the course of five hours each day, periodically floods and drains, requiring a rotating cast of performers to creatively respond to changing levels of water. Holoscenes will be performed from 6pm to 11pm, June 1 – 3.

The Sustainable Dance Floor is developed by Energy Floors.

Holoscenes was created by Lars Jan and Early Morning Opera. It is co-presented by World Science Festival and Times Square Arts, and was originally produced by MAPP International Productions. This presentation of Holoscenes is supported by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Climate Talks at Science in the Square featured: Bill Blakemore, Ted Blanco, James Bronzan, Jeremy Deaton, David Doubilet, Sylvia Earle, Eddie Goldstein, Justin Brice Guariglia, Lars Jan, Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Brian Kahn, Josh Landis, Cassie Lee, Anders Levermann, Suzanne Miller, Stephanie Pfirman, Andrew Revkin, Dan Rizza, Cynthia Rosenzweig, Gavin Schmidt, Ellen Stofan, and Ben Straus.

 

 

 

Learn MoreFree Admission

Immerse yourself in an intense and intimate day with some of the foremost experts in physics and cosmology. This event offers science enthusiasts a curated curriculum that goes beyond a popular-level presentation.

We are providing a limited number of exclusive, complimentary seats to the taping of master classes that will subsequently be presented on the World Science U digital platform.

The application period for this event has ended. Join the waitlist for alerts if additional application opportunities become available.

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ModeratorDanielle Dana
ParticipantsJane Lubchenco

The World Science Festival’s Pioneers in Science program gives high school students from around the globe rare and intimate access to some of the world’s most renowned scientists in a town hall style discussion. Join us to meet marine ecologist, Professor Jane Lubchenco, US Science Envoy for the Oceans and former Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and former Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).​​

Participate in this program online with Zoom. Register today.

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ModeratorJohn Rennie

Big Data is a buzz word used by companies employing analytical methods to gain new insights through the mining of large and varied data sets. However, various fields of Physics also accumulate voluminous data sets that need to be filtered, managed and analyzed. For an increasingly large number of researchers, a growing challenge is how to approach such data. In this seminar-style session, over a light brunch, we will hear different perspectives from leading researchers regarding the handling and exploring of vast quantities of data, and the opportunities Big Data has to offer the future of Physics. Presented in collaboration with Elsevier and the Annals of Physics.

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ModeratorDanielle Dana

The World Science Festival’s Pioneers in Science program gives high school students from around the globe rare and intimate access to some of the world’s most renowned scientists in a town hall style discussion. Join us to meet NASA aerospace engineer, Aprille J. Ericsson, a pioneer in the development of crucial instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope, ICESat, and other missions that monitor the earth and help discover new planets and search for our origins.

Participate in this program online with Zoom. Register today.

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Humans are living longer than ever before: In just a century, American life expectancy has gone from 47 to 79. Today’s scientists are growing hearts in the lab, creating organs with 3D bio-printers, and eliminating cells that shorten life. Will this new technology yield another dramatic increase in life expectancy? Join us for a unique and vibrant discussion that will reveal exciting work that may give birth to the first true millennial, and to debate the social, economic, and environmental ramifications of an immortal society.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Unwrap an evening of mystery and celebrate the American Museum of Natural History’s newest temporary exhibition—Mummies. Join comedian and journalist Faith Salie under the blue whale to unearth rare facts and show off your smarts in a pub-style quiz format. Tackle trivia questions and physical challenges with a drink in hand. And if things get too tough, you might even get an assist from a team of top scientists! Program includes one free drink and special private access to the special exhibition Mummies. Special exhibit access is available to ticket holders one hour prior to the program (6:00-7:00pm).

Presented in collaboration with The American Museum of Natural History. 
Mummies was developed by The Field Museum, Chicago.
Image © 2015 The Field Museum, A115218d_027A, photographer John Weinstein

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Cooking isn’t magic—it’s science! Boiling water for your favorite angel hair pasta? This is merely molecules bouncing around. What about slightly burnt toast with your morning coffee? It’s simply organic compounds in your whole wheat bread being converted to carbon. Whether at breakfast, lunch or dinner, chemistry is always at work. While Serious Eats‘ J. Kenji López-Alt (author of the James Beard Award-winning cookbook The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science) and Popular Science‘s Editor-in-Chief Joe Brown will demonstrate scientifically-based techniques you can take back to your own kitchen. In the meantime, sip some Sauver-private label wine and taste the results of these edible experiments.

This program is presented in collaboration with Popular Science and Saveur.

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ModeratorBrian Greene

Ninety years after the historic double-slit experiment, the quantum revolution shows no sign of slowing. Join a vibrant conversation with renowned leaders in theoretical physics, quantum computation and philosophical foundations, focused on how quantum physics continues to impact understanding on issues profound and practical, from the edge of black holes and the fibers of spacetime to teleportation and the future of computers.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ModeratorJohn Donvan

We humans work together on enormous scales, build complex tools as large as cities, and create social networks that span the globe. What is the key to this innately social profile? How did it evolve? This program will examine the development of the human brain — and the brains of other animals — asking how neurons and synapses orchestrate communal behavior and guide group interactions, demonstrating how our social nature is key to our humanity.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ModeratorLynn Sherr

Hidden Figures revealed hidden heroines in the history of space science. Through their curiosity, tenacity, and courage, these women helped send rockets into space and solve the mysteries of planets, stars, galaxies, and beyond. Join this exciting conversation with scientists, astronauts, and other luminaries who broke down barriers in a male-dominated discipline, as they reflect on the many pivotal but unsung figures of space science, assess the cutting-edge of space exploration initiatives across the globe, and envision the essential role for women in the coming era of discovery.

This program is supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as part of its Public Understanding of Science and Technology Program.

Learn MoreEvent Complete

The World Science Festival brings science to the crossroads of the world, Times Square. From May 31 – June 3, the Festival will descend on Times Square with activities, demonstrations, and installations that educate, entertain, and inspire, providing the public a greater appreciation of our ever-changing planet — and our relationship to it. The programming includes a large LED video wall that powerfully illustrates how global warming is fundamentally changing the earth’s topography; climate talks; and the Sustainable Dance Floor, an innovative dance floor that generates power from human activity. The Sustainable Dance Floor will be open to the public from 7am – 11:59pm. Each day, from 10am – 6pm, guests will be invited to join in for a variety of energy generating games, fitness and dance classes and even a chance to charge their phones through their own movement.

The centerpiece of Science in the Square is Holoscenes, an epic performance-installation that viscerally connects everyday actions to climate change. Born of the widely-shared concern that water — from rising seas, intensifying floods, and extended droughts — will be a defining issue of the 21st century, Holoscenes takes place in a twelve ton glass aquarium which, over the course of five hours each day, periodically floods and drains, requiring a rotating cast of performers to creatively respond to changing levels of water. Holoscenes will be performed from 6pm to 11pm, June 1 – 3.

The Sustainable Dance Floor is developed by Energy Floors.

Holoscenes was created by Lars Jan and Early Morning Opera. It is co-presented by World Science Festival and Times Square Arts, and was originally produced by MAPP International Productions. This presentation of Holoscenes is supported by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Climate Talks at Science in the Square featured: Bill Blakemore, Ted Blanco, James Bronzan, Jeremy Deaton, David Doubilet, Sylvia Earle, Eddie Goldstein, Justin Brice Guariglia, Lars Jan, Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Brian Kahn, Josh Landis, Cassie Lee, Anders Levermann, Suzanne Miller, Stephanie Pfirman, Andrew Revkin, Dan Rizza, Cynthia Rosenzweig, Gavin Schmidt, Ellen Stofan, and Ben Straus.

Learn MoreFree Admission

From Lemon Creek in Staten Island to the shores of the Bronx River, New York’s waterways are teeming with life — and it’s up to you to find it! Led by top marine scientists and biologists in 17 sites across New York’s five boroughs, Westchester, and New Jersey, the Great Fish Count gives attendees of all ages the chance to strap on a pair of waders, cast a net, and discover the underwater world in their own backyard.

Produced in partnership with the Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Illustrations by Jonathan Allen. 

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Scientific MentorDanielle Vellucci

Love isn’t the secret behind grandma’s apple pie; it’s chemistry! Bring your passion for pastries and step into the kitchen at Four & Twenty Blackbirds Bakery in Gowanus, Brooklyn with NYU chemistry professor Danielle Vellucci. Through starch, acid, and heat experiments, discover what causes the ideal flakey crust, creates the most scrumptious filling, and makes the perfect pie. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Scientific MentorJessica Joyner

The human body, the depths of the ocean, and just about every surface imaginable is home to a hidden world of microscopic organisms. Uncover this invisible universe — and how it affects our everyday life — with professor of microbiology, Jessica Joyner, at Brooklyn College. With a microscope as your exploratory tool, examine cells and discover how researchers find small solutions to some of our planet’s biggest problems. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Scientific MentorYemi Amu

Forget the pitchfork and the fishing rod…we’re farming in NYC! Join Yemi Amu, co-founder of OKO Farms in Bushwick, Brooklyn, to learn how to raise fish and grow plants in the same environment. Plant your own seedlings, feed some fish, and tour a farm like no other. Build your own mini aquaponic system and conduct experiments to convert fish waste into nutrients for plants — just like our oceans do naturally every day. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Scientific MentorKubi Ackerman

What kind of New York City will we leave for the next generation? A lot of it has to do with the design of our parks: how they protect the city from environmental challenges, provide recreation, and offer health benefits to those in an urban environment. Architect Kubi Ackerman of the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) is imagining endless possibilities for our future parks, and invites you to do the same. After a walk through Central Park to study the natural environment, explore the MCNY’s Future City Lab to create your own sustainable park. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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ModeratorGeorge Musser

One of the strangest features of quantum mechanics is also potentially its most useful: entanglement. By harnessing the ability for two particles to be intimately intertwined across great distances, researchers are working to create technologies that even Einstein could not imagine, from quantum computers that can run millions of calculations in parallel, to new forms of cryptography that may be impossible to crack. Join us as we explore the coming age of quantum technology, which promises to bring with it a far deeper understanding of fundamental physics.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Scientific MentorJacqueline Faherty

Is there another Planet Earth? Scratch that. Is there even another planet that has life on it? Science says there’s a good chance. In this program, astronomer Jacqueline Faherty of the American Museum of Natural History reveals the different signals exoplanet hunters are using to better understand worlds beyond our own. Take a look through our astronomical backyard and explore the data to find hints of another Earth-like planet. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Science CaptainRoy Arezzo

Raise the sails, trawl for fish, and explore the biodiversity of New York City’s waterways aboard the Mystic Whaler, a reproduction of a late 19th-century coastal cargo schooner. In this family-friendly tour of New York Harbor, biologist Roy Arezzo is on deck to provide an up-close encounter with the oysters that filter our harbors and sustain life in our local waterways. Join him in an exploration of the incredible underwater world in our backyard.

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Join top science authors for coffee and conversation, shop our carefully curated selection of science books, and have your books signed by participating authors.

12:30 PM: Mind Matters with Bill Blakemore, Agustín Fuentes, and Kevin Laland

1:30 PM: Practicing Medicine with Budd Mishkin, Susannah Meadows, and Danielle Ofri

2:30 PM: Atomic Genius with Budd Mishkin, Gino Segrè, and Bettina Hoerlin

3:30 PM: Through the Looking Glass with Wendy Zukerman and Dava Sobel

4:00 PM: Starstruck with Budd Mishkin, Mike Massimino, and Leland Melvin

Learn MoreFree Admission
ParticipantSylvia Earle

Acknowledging the scientists who blazed intellectual trails before him, Isaac Newton wrote: “If I have seen a little further it was by standing on the shoulders of giants.” In this special annual series, we invite our audience to stand on the shoulders of a modern day giant. This year, we are honored to present an address by “Her Deepness,” oceanographer Sylvia Earle. Having logged more than 7,000 hours underwater, Dr. Earle has been at the forefront of ocean exploration for more than four decades. Formerly chief scientist of NOAA, she is the founder of Deep Ocean Exploration and Research, Inc., founder of Mission Blue and SEAlliance, and chair of the Advisory Councils of the Harte Research Institute and the Ocean in Google Earth. Through her leadership of Mission Blue, she has dedicated her life to combating increasing threats to our global ecosystems posed by rising tides and ocean heating. Her research concerns marine ecosystems with special reference to exploration, conservation, and the development and use of new technologies for access and effective operations in the deep sea and other remote environments.

Hosted by the Simons Foundation.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ModeratorSteve Lohr

Computers are getting smarter and more creative, offering spectacular possibilities to improve the human condition. There’s a call to redefine Artificial Intelligence as Augmented Intelligence, to emphasize the potential of humans working with AI as opposed to being replaced by AI. Join AI experts, data scientists, engineers, and ethicists as they explore how we can work alongside machines, when we should trust machines to make cognitive decisions, and how all of society can benefit from the productive and financial gains promised by advances in AI.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ModeratorJim Holt

Physicists and cosmologists are closing in on how the universe operates at its very core. But even with powerful telescopes and particle accelerators pushed to their limits, experimenters struggle to keep up as theoreticians march forward, leaving grand theories untested. Is our universe unique or one of many? Was there a before the Big Bang? Why is there something rather than nothing? Some argue that if these deep questions can’t be answered empirically, they’re not relevant to science. Are they right? Join world-leading cosmologists, philosophers and physicists as they tackle the profound questions of existence.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Raise the sails aboard the Mystic Whaler, a reproduction of a late 19th-century coastal cargo schooner for a scientific exploration of turtle conservation. Work side-by-side with conservation scientist Eleanor Sterling and biologist Eugenia Naro-Maciel to experiment with turtle tagging equipment, examine artifacts, and trace the DNA of underwater creatures. In this family-friendly tour of New York Harbor, you’ll learn how warming waters are impacting sea turtles, other ocean animals, and the underwater world around us.

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ModeratorGuy McKhann

A new generation of technology is revolutionizing neuroscience, allowing a closer study of the brain than had ever seemed possible. They are hybrid disciplines of optics, genetics, and synthetic biology with the ability to manipulate brain activity, often in real time. Some of these techniques hold promise for the treatment of diseases like depression or schizophrenia through direct stimulation of neural connections. This salon takes a deep dive into the techniques and promise of the neural toolkit that is transforming brain science.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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ModeratorAlan Alda

Alan Alda has issued this year’s challenge to the world’s top scientists: What is energy? In an action-packed hour of interactive demonstrations, Alan and a team of experts invite the audience to explore how our bodies use energy, the impact of natural resources, and how we’re going to power the world in the future. The program also highlights the winners of the 2017 Flame Challenge, in which video and written explanations of energy were judged for clarity’s sake…by 20,000 eleven year-olds.

This program is in association with the Flame Challenge, an annual contest held by The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.

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Self-described “nerd farmer,” Caleb Harper, and his team at MIT have created a greenhouse with a brain: these “Food Computers” are enclosed, managed containers that allow you to create the perfect conditions for healthy crops.  The fish-tank-sized farming computer allows Harper to simulate any environment within its glass walls, from ideal tomato-growing weather to the predicted climate and atmospheric conditions of New York in the year 2117. Want to grow a flawless Mexican strawberry in New Jersey?  No problem. Professor Harper and Joe Brown, Editor-in-Chief of Popular Science, demonstrate how this amazing machine came to exist, and how it can be used in our kitchens, schools, and farms going forward.  So grab a seat, pour yourself a glass of wine, and get ready to taste the future.

This program is presented in collaboration with Popular Science and Saveur.

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ModeratorDalton Conley

The astonishing pace at which social and digital media have permeated every aspect of life means the upbringing of today’s children is profoundly different than any human has ever experienced. For nearly all of human history, communication and social interaction involved face-to-face contact. Now, screen-based digital devices mediate a substantial array of interactions. What are the consequences of this pervasive digital environment? Will it impact how children learn to read the emotions and behaviors of others? What is the effect on learning and our ability to pass on knowledge? Join experts in the fields of psychology, linguistics, and technology as they grapple with what it means to be a social human in the digital age.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Brooklyn Bridge Park lights up the night’s sky with high-tech interactive and stargazing activities! Step up to a telescope for an up-close look at the moon, Jupiter, and beyond. Back on Earth, join the one-and-only Bill Nye the Science Guy for a Q&A session and book signing. Then, take part in UP! Umbrella Project, a participatory experience created by Pilobolus in collaboration with MIT Distributed Robotics. Armed with an LED-lighted umbrella, create your own exploding stars and a total eclipse, along with physicists and astronomers in a larger-than-life celebration of our universe. Astronauts Yvonne Cagle and Leland Melvin will also be on hand for space exploration and autograph signing.

 

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Science CaptainSean Dixon

Raise the sails (and a glass) as you embark on an excursion aboard the Mystic Whaler, a reproduction of a late 19th-century coastal cargo schooner. Join fisheries scientist Sean Dixon for an exciting exploration of historical overfishing, its impact on our waters, and how sustainable practices can restore local fisheries.

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ModeratorJohn Donvan

Our age is marked by the proliferation of information, and yet we can’t agree. Science is supposed to be neutral, and yet it has generated some of the deepest societal divides. Why? Our response to scientific information depends on psychology, emotion, peer pressure, politics, and cultural influences. How can we navigate these differences and implement smart policy in a contentious society? Join a vibrant and important discussion examining the interface between the scientific process and the sometimes unscientific public, as we hurtle headlong into an uncertain future.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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The biggest challenge of our time, meeting the energy demands of an exploding population on a warming planet, may well be met by manipulating matter on the tiniest of scales — revolutionizing how we power the planet. Join world-class nanoscientists and environmental leaders to explore how the newfound capacity to harness molecules and atoms is accelerating spectacular inventions — including light-weight “wonder materials,” vital energy-storage technologies, and new sources of renewable energy — which promise to redefine the very future of energy.

The Kavli Prize recognizes scientists for their seminal advances in astrophysics, nanoscience, and neuroscience. The series, “The Big, the Small, and the Complex,” is sponsored by The Kavli Foundation and The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

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Ride a hovercraft, control an underwater rover, and face off with virtual reality dinosaurs. This is Ultimate Science Sunday, an action-packed day of robots, catapults, wind tunnels, telescopes, and so much more! Explore floors of interactive exhibits, demonstrations, and games during this immersive science event that you won’t want to miss. This indoor event is free and open to all ages.

Presented by Con Edison.

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What better way to inspire the next generation of women scientists than to meet working scientists, tour their labs, and learn about their paths to awe-inspiring careers? Women in labs from anthropology, neuroscience, physics, and more open their doors to NYC high school girls at universities throughout the city. Students have the rare opportunity to interact with prominent scientists, experiment with state-of-the-art equipment, and gain insight into the steps they can take now to prepare for successful future in science.

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Books come to life in this special day-long science and story series. Meet top authors of children’s science books and students as young as eight who have won some of the world’s top awards. Then, have your books signed by participating authors and join students at Ultimate Science Sunday to interact with their projects.

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ModeratorAndrew Revkin

Increased standards of living and a global population set to double by 2050 mean skyrocketing demands for energy, resources, and technology. Nanotechnology holds perhaps the biggest promise for finding solutions: From computing, communications, renewable energy and clean water, to medicine, transportation, skincare, sports clothing and food, countless tiny particles, visible only in a microscope, are at work beneath the surface of our daily lives. With so many areas going nano, is it really good for us? Join a group of experts who will explore this emerging area of collaborative research seeking to meet vital challenges while engineering a healthier, safer, and more efficient future.

The Kavli Prize recognizes scientists for their seminal advances in astrophysics, nanoscience, and neuroscience. The series, “The Big, the Small, and the Complex,” is sponsored by The Kavli Foundation and The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

Image Credit: Ariana Levitt, Drexel University, NanoArtography Competition 2016 winner

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Scientific MentorAlyssa Loorya

Construction workers at Washington Square Park recently found two burial vaults from the early 1800s. Now is your chance to uncover New York City history just like scientists do. Join archaeologist Alyssa Loorya to reconstruct artifacts, piece together pottery, and create a map of archaeological sites throughout the city. The program concludes with a walk to the area where the burial vault was discovered at Washington Square Park East. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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Scientific MentorErin Styfco

Building a skyscraper takes more than just an architectural drawing. You have to take into account materials, location, ground structure, and weather. Engineer Erin Styfco leads an exploration of how natural processes — from wind and rain to natural disasters — can affect structures over time. Recreate an earthquake to determine what causes buildings to collapse, and construct your own structure designed to survive the elements. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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ModeratorMario Livio

Leading physicists, astronomers, and astrophysicists discuss how they are pushing the boundaries of scientific imagination to develop experiments that test the seemingly untestable theories of multiverses, eternal inflation, and exotic particles. Join the conversation about their plans to recreate the big bang in particle accelerators here on Earth, as well as their quest to sift through signals from the farthest edges of space for the existence of a multiverse. The stakes are high — as they attempt to answer some of science’s biggest questions, they are testing the limits of experimental and observational science itself.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Scientific MentorRussell Burke

What do turtles, lizards, and coyotes all have in common? They call the New York City area their home. Join Hofstra University biology professor Russell Burke on a journey to study the behavior of our furry and not so furry neighbors. Participate in a study to learn how scientists capture, mark, and release animals to determine their populations in our backyard. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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The World Science Festival’s highly celebrated program, Cool Jobs, is back with an astounding line-up of the coolest science teachers around. Can you break a cinder block on your chest? Dance your way into learning about fossils? Play catch with a robot? These are all things that these people do every day…at work. And all because they know how to make science the most exciting thing around. Come experience their passion during an interactive performance you will not want to miss.

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Scientific MentorCaroline Bragdon

It’s hard to find a New Yorker who hasn’t encountered a rat. They are notoriously clever and hard to control. Thankfully, the scientists at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene are regularly tracking and developing new ways to control our rodent neighbors. You won’t come face-to-face with any rats at this program, but you’ll join research scientist Caroline Bragdon to examine gadgets, track population growth with interactive maps, and search for signs of rodent activity in the local park. This is a student-only program for kids currently enrolled in the 4th grade – 8th grade. Parents/Guardians should drop off their children for this event.

Supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

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ModeratorCarl Zimmer

As a discipline, science aspires to be an evidence-based, non-partisan tool for revealing truth. But science is carried out by scientists, human beings like the rest of us, subject to pressures, preconceptions, and biases. What are the external, non-scientific forces that impact scientific research? Does the current research structure — from government and foundation grant making to peer review and the stiff competition for limited funding — drive focus away from the scientific objective of unbiased exploration? What lessons can we draw from the recent crisis of reproducibility afflicting some research areas? Join an open discussion focused on the myriad factors scientists face in a highly competitive environment as they seek to uphold and advance the ideals of scientific exploration.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Imagine navigating the globe with a map that only sketched out the continents. That’s pretty much how neuroscientists have been operating for decades. But one of the most ambitious programs in all of neuroscience, the Human Connectome Project, has just yielded a “network map” that is shedding light on the intricate connectivity in the brain. Join leading neuroscientists and psychologists as they explore how the Connectome promises to revolutionize treatments for psychiatric and neurological disorders while also answering profound questions regarding the electrochemical roots of memory and behavior, the link between experience and perception, and perhaps the very nature of consciousness itself.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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