FacebookTwitterYoutubeInstagramGoogle Plus

Science in Focus. The Kavli Prize 2020 | Nanoscience

The first electron microscopes enabled scientists to finally view the nanoworld. But because of limitations in the microscope’s lenses, achieving sharp images of individual atoms was not possible. For 60 years scientists struggled with the scopes’ limited abilities.

But now, because of the groundbreaking work of Harald Rose, Ondrej Krivanek, Maximilian Haider, and Knut Urban, the winners of the 2020 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience, scientists today can clearly view and study individual atoms through electron microscopes built with aberration correcting lenses, making sub-ångström imaging and chemical analysis in three dimensions a standard characterization method.

View Additional Video Information

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ERROR: si-captcha.php plugin: GD image support not detected in PHP!

Contact your web host and ask them to enable GD image support for PHP.

ERROR: si-captcha.php plugin: imagepng function not detected in PHP!

Contact your web host and ask them to enable imagepng for PHP.

View More Comments
Load More

Science in Focus. The Kavli Prize 2020 | Nanoscience

The first electron microscopes enabled scientists to finally view the nanoworld. But because of limitations in the microscope’s lenses, achieving sharp images of individual atoms was not possible. For 60 years scientists struggled with the scopes’ limited abilities.

But now, because of the groundbreaking work of Harald Rose, Ondrej Krivanek, Maximilian Haider, and Knut Urban, the winners of the 2020 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience, scientists today can clearly view and study individual atoms through electron microscopes built with aberration correcting lenses, making sub-ångström imaging and chemical analysis in three dimensions a standard characterization method.