The Riddle of Fiction

09/27/12
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In the 1944 Heider-Simmel demonstration, members of a study were shown an animation where shapes moved around the screen. What was discovered was that only three people out of 100 saw shapes moving around. The rest all saw love stories and attributed agency and intent to the shapes. They saw a story. Writer Jonathan Gottschall gives the audience of Why We Tell Stories to view the same Heider-Simmel demonstration. What do you see?

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